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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 11, 2020 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: ahead of an announcement on new coronavirus restrictions — a final night out for some — and last minute meetings in government to iron out the details. a warning the country is at a tipping point in the fight against covid—19 — from england's deputy chief medical officer. donald trump's doctors say he is no longer at risk of spreading coronavirus, meaning he can resume his election campaign. can they do the double? exeter remain on track for domestic and european glory after beating bath to reach
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the premiership final. going out right now to mrs teresa duncan... the dj who spent 50 years making a programme in his garage that only his wife could hear finally gets an audience of thousands in the us. all the weather details coming up very shortly. it's sunday october 11th. our top story: talks on tough new coronavirus restrictions for the worst hit parts of england will take place today. the discussions between the government and local leaders will be held ahead of an expected announcement on the new rules by the prime minister tomorrow. england's deputy chief medical officer has warned the country is at a "tipping point" in what he called "our national fight" against covid—19. as john mcmanus reports. it has been a tough year so far and
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it's understandable that people are keen to unwind. with further restrictions on socialisation looming, last night in liverpool, anywhere making the most of what may bea anywhere making the most of what may be a final weekend of partying. for now, at least. it seems at for some parts of the country, a difficult winter may be on the way and the government needs the public to co—operate. government needs the public to co-operate. i think it could be managed a lot better. i don't think all this lockdown thing works, everybody going home at ten o'clock. i think it could be managed better. never been told what to expect so as of monday, we are getting an announcement but we don't know what we are being announced to, you know, so we are being announced to, you know, so it is kind of like it is every thing going to be shut down or you just planning on shutting down click certain things or what? liberty has any idea. i think we would support any idea. i think we would support any measures that keep people safe as long as business owners were supported by the government, we would be happy with that. the expected new rules may have a particular impact on parts of the
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north of england because that's where infections are rising fastest. the details are still being finalised but they are expected to focus on a three tiered system. the worst affected areas could be subject to club —— pub closures, restau ra nt subject to club —— pub closures, restaurant restrictions and restrictions on indoor and outdoor meeting. but the government's latest plans to support staff whose industries need to close at this man says they don't go too far enough. you may not go to work, you may not trade, when the state says that, people should be getting 100% compensation. being paid to of your wages, especially if you are on minimum wage, is not acceptable. the political arguments are taking place against a backdrop of renewed warning as against the virus. professor donovan van tams has the country is now at a similar point to where it was in march. that is when infections were rising and they were fears the nhs would be overwhelmed.
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but with better testing and treatment, he says history doesn't have to repeat itself. also key of course is controlling the rate of transmission. the prime minister's statement on monday is expected to point to how that might be achieved. john mcmanus, bbc news. let's speak now to our political correspondent jessica parker. jessica, what are they likely to be discussing? the papers filled with speculation about what is likely to have —— happen tomorrow. we don't know for certain. what will happen today? conversations will continue going on between downing street and local leaders. we know number ten pretty keen to be seen engaging with regional leaders after they were accused of basically doing the opposite previously so those conversations will carry on and is reported tomorrow, we are expecting to hear from the reported tomorrow, we are expecting to hearfrom the prime minister in the house of commons, likely laying out three tier system of restrictions, each tier being a
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different level of restrictions. of course, yesterday we had from the liverpool labour city mayor joe anderson who was saying he expected his area to be tier three, the most severe set of restrictions where you could see pub closures. it comes as john was saying is led by andy berman, the greater manchester mayor, setting it accompanying financial package that will come alongside these announcements made by the prime minister and rishi sunak, as not being enough. he was saying if you are on minimum wage in your place of work is being forced to close, being paid to those of your wages will not be enough to make ends meet. the government is saying it is offering an unprecedented level of financial support. it is only part of a package of measures. but as that argument rain —— may ramble on this week, at least tomorrow we will hear some confirmation as to exactly what is going on because millions of people across the country waiting to hear what level of restrictions they are going to be living under going forward in england. that weight will
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soon be over. —— wait. president trump has held his first public event since being hospitalised with covid—i9. delivering a speech from the balcony of the white house, mr trump told hundreds of cheering supporters that he was "feeling great". but, there has been criticism over a lack of social distancing. our north america correspondent david willis is in los angeles for us this morning. david, how has the president's speech been received ? well, i should have to say to you that a lot of people are now very much astonished by the latest doctor's notes that have come out here, the president's. is basically saying that all of his symptoms have improved, that he has had no signs of fever for the last 2a hours and
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basically that he poses no threat of transmission to others. what they're not saying is whether he has tested negative for covid—i9 and of course they have been very guarded throughout this whole process, ever since president trump was actually diagnosed with the coronavirus. the president himself said earlier today that he is feeling pretty well, but he didn't seize the chance that he tested negative for covid—i9 and you would have thought that had he done so would have thought that had he done so then he wouldn't be able to resist telling everybody. but he didn't, it was a rally in front of about 400 people at the white house today and the president of course is has been itching to get back on the campaign trail, he has largely been quarantined of calls for more than the last week and his democratic rivaljoe biden out there on the hustings and extending his lead in nationwide polls.
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a scottish mp who was suspended from the snp for taking a train from london to glasgow after testing positive for covid—i9 has defied calls for her to resign. in an interview with the scottish sun on sunday, margaret ferrier said she panicked and that the virus made her act "out of character". she added that her "hard work and dedication" shouldn't be wiped away for an "error of judgement". the number of people who have died from covid—i9 in brazil, has now passed 150,000. this means it has the second highest death toll in the world, after the united states. the number of confirmed cases in the country passed five million earlier this week. presidentjair bolsonaro has been criticised for his handling of the pandemic and accused of downplaying the risks of the virus. the bcg vaccine has been protecting millions of children worldwide against tuberculosis for nearly a century — but scientists are now hoping it may help to save lives from covid—i9. researchers believe
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the vaccine causes wide—spread changes to the immune system, which could help in the protection against other infections — like coronavirus. now, a uk based trial is being launched to test the theory. here's our health and science correspondent james gallagher. in the fight against covid, scientists are turning to one of our old est scientists are turning to one of our oldest vaccines. a new preventive one hasjoined the battle... . bcg. it was first discovered in 1921 and has been given to hundreds of thousands of people but doctors think that its effects on the immune system may lessen the effects of coronavirus, too. this gp‘s system may lessen the effects of coronavirus, too. this gp'sjob dealing with patients put him at higher risk of getting covid. he is one of a thousand people in the uk including care home staff and other healthcare workers who will take pa rt healthcare workers who will take part in the trial stop having had
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the vaccine in childhood, will not offer protection today. there is a huge reason behind why getting there —— the huge reason behind why getting there -- the bcg huge reason behind why getting there —— the bcg vaccine will reduce the impacts of covid—19. —— the bcg vaccine will reduce the impacts of covid-19. sam will either get the bcg jab or a dummy injection and then researchers will wait to see if the vaccine either alters the odds of getting covid or the severity of the infection. the data collected here in exeter will be combined with studies in australia, the netherlands, spain and brazil. there is no evidence bcg will help in the pandemic so why do researchers help it mike? seems odd. vaccines are supposed to protect against one specific infection so why mighta against one specific infection so why might a tubercular notice jab also have a benefit in coronavirus? well, there is some interesting signs that suggests vaccines might have a wide effect across the whole
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of the immune system, that may give oui’ of the immune system, that may give our bodies and edge against other viruses and infections, too. and indeedin viruses and infections, too. and indeed in trials with the bcg jab, there has been a fall in death rates from other infections after people we re from other infections after people were vaccinated. the world health 0rganization says the bcg jab might help reach the gap until a dedicated coronavirus vaccine is developed. this could be of huge importance globally because bcg, while we don't think it is, it is not specific against covid, but it has the potential to buy perhaps several yea rs of potential to buy perhaps several years of time for the covid vaccines to come through and other treatments to come through and other treatments to be developed. there are ten coronavirus vaccines in the final phase of testing but none has yet been proven effective. let's hope that turned out well. britain's got talent finally crowned its winner last night, after the pandemic caused a 6 month delay between broadcasting the auditions and the live shows.
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# and it won't be long until these masks are gone, we will be living life again to the maximum! # and we will remember people like sircaptain tom... musical comedian jon courtenay became the first golden buzzer act to win the show and bagged himself a coveted slot at the royal variety performance and 250,000 pounds. not bad worth the wait in the end. not bad worth the wait in the end. not a bad first prize! congratulations to him. the kind of entertainment of which are britain's got talent does really well. the whole family can enjoy. nice wholesome. nice and easy, unlike today's papers. let's take a look at some of today's front pages. the sunday telegraph looks ahead to the prime minister's announcement of further coronavirus restrictions expected tomorrow. the paper says millions will be asked not to travel outside of their local areas and "could be banned from mixing with other households".
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that north—south divide has prompted this eye—catching image in the sunday people. it claims that borisjohnson is becoming more like margaret thatcher in his attitude to northern england. ididn't i didn't sleep so well after i saw that picture last night. the mail on sunday reports that the health secretary matt hancock flouted the existing restrictions by "drinking in a commons bar beyond 10pm" and made a "crass joke about the government's test and trace failings". a spokesman for the health secretary said: "no rules have been broken". and one of the trending stories on twitter overnight was strictly come dancing's tribute to its former winner caroline flack, who died in february. a lot of people commented on how moving it was. it certainly was. looking inside the papers this morning, this caught my
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eye in the sunday times. lots of people working from home made fancy pa nts people working from home made fancy pants sheds in their garden as a place where they can work from home efficiently. people said it is away from kids, no kids zone, high internet but this couldn't be more 2020, you try and make the best out ofa 2020, you try and make the best out of a covid situation and it turns out you could be taxed on that property when it comes to selling it. people say i am creating a nice workspace at home... that is a proper shed, isn't it? it is considered a place of work rather than leisure. you cannot win this year, can you? just get all the computers out and shove your lawnmower in there... this is another coronavirus story. a night —— nicely staged photograph taken in a rock in scotland, a stream. 0ld prospectors feel that pool of scotland's streams —— brooke. lots
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of people who have maybe been furloughed have been panning for gold in scotland. these two chaps have been quite practised and efficient at it. one of them makes about £6,000 a year in terms of the amount of gold that he manages to find. there are so many activities people are taking part in because of coronavirus. we have done local outdoor swimming and we never would have done that in october before coronavirus! but because we aren't allowed to take the kids indoor anywhere, we have been braving the elements. it is a bit snippy. have you got ahead to christmas yet? —— nippy. no. a warning. you got ahead to christmas yet? —— nippy. no. awarning. if you got ahead to christmas yet? —— nippy. no. a warning. if you are planning to shop online, not much to see here but 11 weeks until christmas... shoppers are worried because already 0cado delivery slots have been snapped up. mind you, i love the christmas shop. three or four rounds, by some bit and bobs.
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reviewing could be on the shopping list. rihanna has apparently made plus sized men the next big thing, she used to plus sized mail model. stevie g is the chap. she has been getting a lot of praise having plus sized men. stevie g? he looks different. the story about portuguese wine, that was getting you most excited. let's take in the weather. good morning, louise, lovely to see you. very autumnal behind you. i'm so glad you didn't ask me about christmas. well we have snow? don't you dare. yes, real beautiful autumn day and you should beautiful autumn day and you should be able to get out and see some of autumn colour today. it is going to
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bea autumn colour today. it is going to be a bit quieter than yesterday. got larger wins for most of us. and a lot of dry bright weather around. the wind direction coming from a north or north—westerly so it is cold. yesterday's weather front eased away. we are under the influence of high pressure. you can also see a weather front waiting out in the wings, bringing some rain through monday. for today, in the wings, bringing some rain through monday. fortoday, lighter wind for most of us. we got rather brisk northerly winds which will continue to drive a few showers on those exposed east coasts. the further west to go, the best of any sunshine. lots of sunshine around today and with lighter wind around as well. perhaps feeling a bit better but temperatures are not going to suggest it. wind direction from the north. lighter wind for most of us. temperatures between ten and 15 degrees. get out and enjoy yourself if you can. through this
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evening, we keep those clear skies but you can also see out to the west, clouding over a little. rain moving into northern ireland and the western fringes of scott. that is the weather front toppling there. we will see temperatures of around eight, nine degrees. under clear skies further east, lower single figures. a bit of a north—south divide first thing on monday. best of the end bright weather first thing in the south—east, bringing rain and increasingly strengthening wind. the rain first thing rain and increasingly strengthening wind. the rainfirst thing in the morning up to the north—west will gradually drift east. it means an improving picture through western scotla nd improving picture through western scotland and northern ireland. the rain finally but slowly getting into the south—east by the end of the day. underneath the cloud and rain, temperatures could struggle. it's going to feel pretty dismal for this time of year. that weather front
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will slowly ease away, grinding to a halt on tuesday, down into the south—east. we could see some out weeks of rain at times. a slow improvement up into the north. the wind direction coming from the northerly so however we look at this week's weather, temperatures will be subdued for the middle part of tober. tuesday, showery rain to the south, brighter in the north. drier, sunnier weather developing fairly widespread across the country wednesday into thursday. if you have plans this week, hold off to the middle part of the week. every bit of decent weather will count as these restrictions go on so good to see there is a bit of sunshine. let's catch up on the sports news. holly is with us. starting with rugby union. we have a premiership line—up finally. exeter remain on course for a domestic and european double
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after reaching the premiership final. their win over bath takes them into a showdown against wasps later this month in what will be a repeat of the final three years ago. ben croucher was watching. it's been a long wait but exeter are nearly there. a european final next weekend, a premiership one after that. english rugby's powerhouse charging their way past or before them in 2020. beneath the bodies, them in 2020. beneath the bodies, the bill, the beginning of bath's battering. even if you can't see it, you can feel it. the coach said they had nothing to fear. stuart hogg may have given him course to reconsider. a nightmare afternoon was only getting worse. a fifth st appearance in the twickenham showpiece and well worth the wait. wasps haven't been there since 2017 when they lost to exeter seemed in a hurry and their semi against bristol. it took less
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than ten minutes to set the tone for their return. brute force was working, the jack willis time may not have been as fashionable but was not have been as fashionable but was no less enjoyable wherever you were watching, for most onlookers anyway. eight months after sacking the coach, languishing 10th, wasps were flying down the touchline over the try line. bristol's 36 year absence from a twickenham final continues the wasps. not long to go now. ben croucher, bbc news. as the english season draws to a close, the pro14 is already underway where cardiff made it two wins from two with victory over connaught. elsewhere ulster beat 0spreys, whilst edinburgh lost to munster. the women's premier 15 rugby season is under way in england, after last season was declared null and void in april due to the pandemic. gloucester—hartpury got their campaign off to a flying start with a bonus—point win at home to exeter chiefs. this early score from kelly smith was the pick of the cherry and whites' six tries as they won 34—14.
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elsewhere there were wins for saracens, loughborough and harlequins, who beat durham 103—0. it's one of the dream dates in tennis, rafa nadal against novak djokovic in the french open men's final later. polish teenager iga swiatek beat australian open champion sophia kenin to win the women's final yesterday. at number 54 in the world, swaitek is the lowest ranked woman finalist at roland garros for 43 years, but the former junior wimbledon champion won the first set against the american 6—4. she hadn't dropped a set throughout the tournament, and that record continued as she swept kenin aside winning the second by six games to one. she's poland's first grand slam champion. and britain's alfie hewett completed a perfect french open,
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beating joachim gerard for his fourth grand slam wheelchair singles title. he also won the doubles title on friday with gordon reid. he said he was going out for pizza to celebrate last night. despite not claiming pole for today's eifel grand prix, lewis hamilton has history on his side as he bids to equal michael schumacher‘s record 91 formula 1 victories. his mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas was quarter of a second quicker around germany's nurburgring, ending hamilton's run of five poles in a row. however all is not lost for hamilton as four of the last five winners at this circuit have started from second on the grid. i'm 0k, i'm ok, i don't really know what happened in q3. i'm ok, i don't really know what happened in 03. so in my mind, i'm curious as to what led us to lose a bit of pace. but you don't have to
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get them all, so i'm pretty chilled. he's spent most of the year playing in america but tyrell hatton is in prime position to win this side of the pond — with a 3 shot lead going into the final round of the pga championship at wentworth. he made an eagle and three birdies on his way to 14 under par. hatton's been playing in a hoodie at wentworth and is offering to give some away to his social media followers. he's trying to stay focused on the task in hand though. evenif even if guys get off to a really hot start and i don't, there are so many opportunities out there if you play well and i just had opportunities out there if you play well and ijust had to allow myself to give myself opportunities to do that, so just had to stay in the moment and see how it plays out. south korea's kim sei—young has a two shot lead going into the final round of the women's pga championship in philadelphia. this would be herfirst major if she can hold on. charley hull is the highest placed briton seven shots behind.
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portugal'sjoao almeida leads the giro d'italia with 13 stages to go, but stage 8 yesterday was all about britain's alex dowsett. the time—trial specialist broke away with 11 miles to go, and held on to win the stage by over a minute. he rides for the israel start—up nation team, who chris froome isjoining next year. arsenal and everton will have the chance to go top of the women's super league today — hoping to leapfrog manchester united. they're setting the pace — albeit having played a game more — thanks to a 1—nil win over tottenham. millie turner's second half header proving the winner. all four home countries are in nations league action today. the third round of fixtures. england will have a newly annointed mbe in their ranks in striker you marcus rashford, after his campaign to help feed deprived children this
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year — much to the delight of his national manager. we are all very proud of him, we gave him a special round of applause this morning because i think, as a group, we are very close, we've watched him grow... i'm saying grow up watched him grow... i'm saying grow up but he is still 22, so, yeah, you can only marvel at what he's achieved, really, and the difference is made. it's so good, the fact that he is reminding us he is 22 years old. he's made such difference, it's remarkable. we will be talking about his school meals campaign after seven o'clock. such a horrible year in so many ways. it's great to have something on lifting us. but it's business as usual for england later. five o'clock, belgium. back to his dayjob, i'm afraid. roger, are five o'clock, belgium. back to his day job, i'm afraid. roger, are you ajoy division day job, i'm afraid. roger, are you a joy division fan? you strike me as one? of course. 40 years ago, ian curtis, the lead singer of band
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joy division, took his own life aged 23, after struggling with his mental health. now a mural paying tribute to the musical icon has been painted in his home city of manchester in the hope it could encourage others to seek help. kelly foran reports. love, love tear us apart, again... j°y love, love tear us apart, again... joy division, pioneers of the post punk movement. but the night before the first big american tour, lead singer ian curtis took his own life after suffering from epilepsy and depression. he was only 23. his band mate and friend says 40 years ago, mental health was even more so just something people didn't talk about. what he went through, you know, it must‘ve been so difficult and, in funny way, i still live with the guilt of it, you know, survivor ‘s
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guilt of it, you know, survivor ‘s guilt thing, so it's been a great help to me to realise that these days there is so much more help and people need to seek it. this mural has been done for the manchester mental health festival this weekend but will stay here for good. mental health festival this weekend but will stay here for goodm caught the eyes, magnificent, which was one of ian's striking features, his eyes, which always looked so warm and friendly and then he went and looks like a demon, was fantastic. behind those eyes were a sadness that he didn't share with many. ian suffered greatly and i suppose one of the odd things about ian is that he soldiered on and it didn't do him much good, sadly. and this street artist akse's way of getting people to talk. it's a great way to do it, especially when lockdown has affected so many people. it's a critical issue. his murals have been changing the face of manchester. you might recognise a
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few. i think they're probably still is to some that street arkea wills graffiti, graffiti equals vandalism, vandalism bring down scenario but in actual fact it is an art gallery on the street. it is hoped that remembering this manchester music legend in such a striking way will encourage people who walked past it or come to see it to open up that conversation about mental health. it's nice that manchester remembers and it's a wonderful tribute. ijust watched so many people smile and be absolutely blown away with the sight of it this morning, just a part of it, so it's nice, it's lovely. that was kelly foran there with that report. the talent to create that on a wall was phenomenal. a beautiful tribute and again, holly speaking earlier
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about marcus rushford being 22. he was 23 when he died, such an amazing musician by that age. do stay with us, headlines shortly. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. plans for tougher coronavirus restrictions for the worst hit parts of england, will be finalised today. discussions between the government and local leaders will be held ahead of an expected announcement
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on the new rules by the prime minister tomorrow. meanwhile, england's deputy chief medical officer warned the country is at a "tipping point", in what he called "our national fight" against covid—19. a scottish mp who was suspended from the snp for taking a train from london to glasgow, after testing positive for covid—19, has said she won't resign. in an interview with the scottish sun on sunday, margaret ferrier said she panicked and that the virus made her act "out of character". she added that her "hard work and dedication" shouldn't be wiped away for an "error of judgement". president trump is no longer at risk of transmitting covid—19, according to the white house physician. earlier on saturday he delivered a speech from the white house balcony, in his first public event since being hospitalised, and told the crowd he was "feeling great". but, questions have been raised over the safety of the gathering, after pictures showed hundreds of people packed tightly together.
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uk scientists have begun testing the bcg vaccine, which is usually used to protect against tuberculosis, to see if it could help treat covid—19. researchers believe that its effect on the immune system, could also be used to fight coronavirus. thousands of people will now take part in a trial lead by the university of exeter, which will test this theory. since schools returned last month, thousands of pupils have already been sent home to self isolate. with year group bubbles often including more than 200 children, a confirmed case of covid—19 can mean everyone staying at home, even ifjust one child tests positive. but one secondary school in gloucestershire is now using contact tracing to reduce
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the number of children missing class, as our social affairs correspondent, fiona lamdin reports. the impact of covid continues to touch everyone in education. a week ago, the virus arrived at the school in south gloucestershire. after a people in new nine tested positive. initially all 150 students were sent home to isolate that with track and trace, staff were able to study seating plans and cctv and work out exactly who had been in contact with her. like a military operation, almost, identifying seating plans, going to the class, measuring trip metres from the child's chair, identifying those students, identifying those students, identifying members of staff who may be had contact with them. and as a result, 121 students were back in class at the start of this week. is ita orb? a, class at the start of this week. is ita or b? a, they class at the start of this week. is it a or b? a, they both believe change can be made... religion and ethics is being taught in this class was not these are six other lucky
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ones. you can get everything done here and go home and relax. s it would be easy for the teachers to teach us. but they should be 31 stu d e nts teach us. but they should be 31 students in class today. the others are still learning, just at home. this is the dining room now doubling up this is the dining room now doubling up as fiona's temporary classroom. it is weird, i have kind of gotten used to it because obviously we have beenin used to it because obviously we have been in lockdown for so long, unused to sitting on the table and doing my work and getting on with it. it was nice to see my friends for a couple of weeks. it is also causing problems for fiona's dad and his work. it is difficult to stop i am self—employed. working in the fitness industry. it isjust self—employed. working in the fitness industry. it is just kind of this state of flux, you can't get your teeth into anything that you wa nt to your teeth into anything that you want to be doing because you never know what's going to be happening next week. fiona is going to be allowed to school next tuesday but the school fully expects they will
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be many more cases before this pandemic is over. it is an issue that is going to be with us for a long time to come, isn't it? interesting that schools are bringing measures into their own hands. we have already had one of a couple of weeks but we are not alone in facing couple of weeks but we are not alone infacing a couple of weeks but we are not alone in facing a problem at the moment. time now for a slightly longer film than we normally show here on breakfast. it's about three black british students during their first year at cambridge university. the institution is making more effort to attract students from black and minority ethnic communities — so bbc reporter ashley john—ba ptiste followed their progress over three terms, to see what the experience was like. for black students, studying at one of the most prestigious universities in the world, academic pressure isn't always the only challenge. for some, it can feel like entering a
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new world. you feel like you have to be strong. my mum keeps saying to me, just keep fighting. just keep going, just get that degree. over the years, 0xford going, just get that degree. over the years, oxford and cambridge universities have come under pressure for their lack of ethnic diversity. i think it is a place where race has not been acknowledged as relevant, particularly to the whole intellectual experience at cambridge. last year at cambridge the numbers improved on previous yea rs the numbers improved on previous years with the university accepting a record number of 91 black british undergraduates, but beyond numbers is the experience. i'm ashley john—baptiste, a bbc reporter but also a cambridge graduate myself and while i'm so glad i studied there, asa while i'm so glad i studied there, as a mixed race south londoner who grew up in care, it felt were apart
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from what i was used to —— worlds apart. i wanted to find out what life in cambridge has been like for a new wave of lack british students. —— black. the data is stark. black tradition undergraduates have never made up more than 3% of cambridge's undergraduate population. it doesn't include international students who roughly make up a quarter of all undergraduates. steps have been made to improve things. in 2018, the university launched this scholarship to fund a number of black students but i know firsthand, once you enter cambridge, is not uncommon to feel out of place and as much as the university offered support, i often feel like an imposter and totally out of my depth. it is because of my own experience that i want to know
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how current black students are helping in a space that is still predominantly white and privileged. and to give us that insight, meet fabiana, success and sharon. having started their first term last 0ctober, started their first term last october, i caught up with them a few weeks in. success is from manchester studying medicine. for his nigerian pa rents, studying medicine. for his nigerian parents, seeing his son studying at cambridge. people make fun of you. why are you studying so much? are you going to cambridge? that tells you going to cambridge? that tells you the position where cambridge is, it isa you the position where cambridge is, it is a big thing for us. did you worry about what it would be like for your son being in cambridge as a
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black person? socially, is he going to cope? how is he going to cope eating, feeding himself? why do you mean by that? -- what do you mean by that? they don't have african food there, will he continue to eat fish and chips every day? burger every day. they don't have any rice, and if there is no rice, there is no rice. i was definitely worried. first thought, definitely ethnic diversity. i could count the ethnic people i saw that on two hands. success is enjoying university a few weeks in but he wasn't concerned about finding a barber in cambridge who could cut afro hair. big day? well... success, why is it taking it
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so long to get your in cambridge? is it going to look like this for eight weeks? am i going to have to buy 50 hats to cover it up? were you concerned that you wouldn't be able to find a barber shop that could do afro hair? yeah, genuinely. i was a bit worried about it. a few weeks into cambridge, how's it going? yeah. oh, man, it's stressful! i did kind of worry about fitting in myself, from where i come from, which is very traditional, very nigerian culture, into what is, what i see to be like an upper—class, like, white community. so, i was a bit worried. but it has been good. i've found people that are quite like me. i've found people who are very different to me but we get on. yeah, it's just been a really good experience. i can't lie, it's been brilliant. when i heard about cambridge and oxford and all that kind of stuff, they were places i wanted to go to.
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sharon, from tottenham, is studying history and spanish. herfamily, of eritrean origin, have come to visit. growing up, cambridge was seen as something so unattainable, but it was a goal, you wanted to go to cambridge. i feel like cambridge is very welcoming. like, representing, for eritrea, there's not that many eritreans that go to cambridge. i came forjust a short time in this country and i never dreamed that my daughter would go to cambridge, but it isjusta dream. thank you, sharon, you make me proud as a mum. i think you do get a sense that you are different. it doesn't feel bad, but it's just something that you do have to kind of think about, you know, if you go into certain classes, you might be the only person of colour there. you might be the only
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black face there. you might be the only one with your hair there, do you know what i mean, like? your hair? yeah. what you mean by that? like, curly hair, afro hair. one of my friends said, they changed hairstyle, and people didn't recognise who they were. academically, it has definitely lived up to its name, but what i was surprised about was how i've been eased into it, in a way. fabianna is from coventry, where she lives with herjamaican mum. she's studying psychology and behavioural sciences. you know where you're going, so you have to play the part. it don't work overnight, just get up and say, i'm going to be posh, you've been working towards this. you are not a follower, you are a leader. i'm a leader. yeah, you are. just a few weeks in, fabianna says she encountered racial discrimination from another student at a social event. the incident involved the use of a racial slur. when we were all drinking together, this boyjust said like a really ignorant comment, he said, "i'm too drunk to say the n—word." so that was something that, like, threw me off, because i had never really experienced someone outwardly saying something like that to me, i had never been called the n—word or anything like that.
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and just for detail, this happened on site at the university? yeah. and this was another cambridge student? yeah. so, it happened at girton, in a bar, when we were all drinking together, by another student. was this a white student? yeah, it was a white student, a white boy. it really threw me off, because i was with another friend of mine that's also black, and we were just, like, we had never gone through something like that. you're used to the micro—aggressions, but you're not used to someone outwardly saying something like that to you. she decided not to report the issue, but confronted the student privately, who she says later apologised. when that comment was said, what went through your head? it was mainly just shock, i couldn't say anything, everyone was just like, oh, my gosh, i can't believe he just said that. but no—one really spoke up apart from me and my black friend. but when someone makes a comment to you like that, you're definitely, like,
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i'm black at cambridge. whilst the incident did have a negative impact, fabianna is positive about her start at cambridge. what do you want out of your first year at cambridge university? i just want to build loads of relationships with people. being here, any conversation you have could be a link for yourfuture. mostly, i'm fine, i'm having a good time. it's been really, really good. it's not too long after her own encounter that fabianna hears of another black student who alleges they have been discriminated against. according to the student, the incident involved a staff member from trinity college, which is one of the colleges of cambridge university. all the i was on the train, one of my feet was on the seat and i wasjust sitting there.
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a man from trinity college came on, looked at me in disgust and just literally looked over and said bleep. verbally assaulted me on the train. for no reason? literally no reason. the only reason, i believe, was because my foot was on the seat. no—one was around and i was unwell. he had the trinity college lanyard, he had the trinity college tie, he had the trinity college uniform, it was very clear that he was from there. and when i said to him, i'm just letting you know, i'm going to be reporting you to the university for what you just called me. he said, go on then, i've got loads of friends who work in the university. i think to myself, would i have been spoken to like that if i was a white man? so, did you complain to the university about the situation? i complained to the university, yes, they sent me some links in an e—mail, they sent me over to a complaints line
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that i could use. i had people contacting me, saying, where are you, and i felt too embarrassed to even reply to them and say what was going on, because it was having such an effect on me. it was having such an effect on me. and it really grates me that i'm getting emotional about it. yeah. cos you feel like you have to be strong, you know? my mum keeps saying to me, just keep fighting. just keep going, just get that degree. she was saying, do you want to drop out? do you want to leave? you felt like you wanted to drop out, because of these incidents? i have, but i'm fighting for every other black person who i know who needs to occupy the spaces, because black people need to come here, black people need to know that they need to get here so that we can pave the way for others and we need to break that glass ceiling. and i will not leave this place and i will not shut up, i will not be quiet until i see change. the university said that
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nia told her college... knee they understand that no action was taken. the university has taken steps to improve its diversity, but it's clear that some black students still struggle. i took the guys to share their concerns with the university's vice chancellor. a lot of black students feel like, when they get here, they don't really feel like a part of the university. incidents where we just feel like outcasts. what mechanisms does university have for issues that black students experience? so, the first step is creating a critical mass of bame students, black students in particular, so that people never feel alone. one of the things that we have done is committed to a three—year programme of increasing dialogue around issues of race. do you think this is a place that is institutionally racist? i think it's a place where race has not been acknowledged as relevant, particularly to the whole intellectual experience of being at cambridge. so, in that sense, i would say
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it is racist because it doesn't acknowledge race in people's lives. my commitment to every student coming to cambridge is that she or he should feel that they are fully a part of the institution. part of that is making sure that people who come from backgrounds that are different ,and particularly students who come from race backgrounds that are not dominant, have to feel at home. what do you guys make of the stormzy scholarship? you know, i think it's sick. i really, really love the work that you guys and stormzy have done. yes, it was great, but i was wondering, is this really his responsibility? so, the stormzy scholarships are not the only scholarships available to black students, or any student, for that matter. we've got a huge initiative called the student support initiative, where we're trying to raise £500 million as part
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of ouroverall campaign, purely for student support and that's really directed at people who are coming from widening participation backgrounds, less—privileged backgrounds, who wouldn't necessarily feel that they had the resources to come to a place like cambridge. it is our responsibility. stormzy came to us and we were really grateful, because it was a way of telling the story in a much more accessible manner, but it's a much wider story than just stormzy. since last meeting the students, they've all joined the university's african caribbean society, also known as the acs. it's a university club that celebrates african and caribbean culture and tonight, a few weeks into the new term, they're attending a special dinner. it's not your average student party, but it's still a vibe. there's a strong turnout for the dinner, made up entirely of black and ethnic minority students. we had a group of students who suggested that we run a dinner specifically
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to celebrate our ethnic diversity in cambridge. we thought it was a great idea, we decided to put it on, host the event and because it was so popular, we've done it every year since then. after a drinks reception, the students make their way into the main hall for tonight's dinner. wanipa is the president of the acs. when i was at cambridge as a student, would you get a room full of black and ethnic minority students? we are alljust here existing and it is a beautiful symbol of how far we have come. we are here to stay. we are here to stay, i'm not leaving now! what's on the menu? so, we have got caribbean spiced chicken wings or cauliflower, and we have got some salmon jerk, caribbean pea rice. wow! so it's caribbean food? yeah, caribbean pea rice. 0k. interesting, interesting. it was just over halfway through the academic year that the national lockdown was announced as a result of the coronavirus. the university closed,
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students sent home, lectures were moved online. it marked the end of their student experience as they knew it. we will beat the coronavirus and we will beat it together and therefore, i urge you, at this moment of national emergency, to stay at home, protect our nhs and save lives. this whole coronavirus thing has just been getting on my nerves. i feel like it's stressing everyone out, there's nothing to look forward to, because summer's basically locked off now. this whole situation isjust putting the whole country into panic. i wish that this virus would just disappear next week, but it seems to be getting worse and worse. i've done lots of work but i have nothing to show for the year. i have to take exams at home. it'sjust like, it's not going to be an
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accurate representation of what i am capable of, because i'm going to be doing it at home and there are loads of students, like myself, who have in an environment at home where you just feel like you can't really work. itjust makes me feel, like, what was the point of this year? ifeel like i need a refund on my 9k or something. this is me on my last day here in cambridge for the entire year. this coronavirus stuff has made it so the term's been cancelled. it's really sad. the university issued, like, a code red. those who could leave were asked to leave as soon as possible. it's been four weeks, i think, since i was back at home. what the heck is going on with my hair? the exams are in september now. it is what it is. i've not done any work in, like, three weeks. term is cancelled in terms of, there's not going to be anything in cambridge, but we still have online lectures.
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nothing, is what i've been up to. i've done literallyjack. work has been practically nonexistent. and whilst dealing with lockdown, black lives matter protests broke out across the uk in the summer, following the death of george floyd in the us. black lives matter! my mental health is not in the best shape. i'm sure every black person in cambridge has a story to share about some sort of covert racism or ignorance that we've experienced and it's nice, in times like this, when black lives are up for discussion, having people around you who have had the same experiences as you. it's kind of hard, being away from cambridge and not having that support system. so, yeah, it makes me miss cambridge a lot. uni's almost done, i have literally one assessment left to do and then i'm finished first year. it's saturday the 6th ofjune and we're on our way to our second protest for black lives matter.
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it wasjust, like, the best thing, the level of solidarity, the level of unity. it's been really amazing, despite whatever the media's trying to say, like, they were trying to make it out as being really violent, it was not, it was really peaceful. 0k, i've just come off the phone, i've just had my director of studies meeting, which is like my parents evening without my parents, and i got my exam results. somehow, i managed to bag a first in both history and in spanish. and when she told me, iwasjust, like.. ijust, i don't know how, especially in this term, because it's been disgracefully hard. i don't think i've actually had time to just process this year properly and sit down and i don't know... a lot of it was kind of filled with fear and obviously the whole imposter syndrome and feeling, do you really belong here? are you really the type of person they're looking for, were you just like a pity acceptance ?
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all those kind of things that rush into your mind, and then to come out the other side. i don't know, it's a miracle. and if this is what i can achieve in my first year, best believe. it's been so long since i've seen the students, so long that a whole term has passed. i catch up with them to find out how, despite everything that's happened, they feel their first year has panned out. all right, so, you guys have had a year of being at cambridge. is this a space where black people can flourish? it is, it is. because i feel like i've learned a lot about myself and i have always wbeen very aware of my blackness, very immersed in my culture, but i always say that i've never felt as black as i have here in cambridge. what do you mean by that? i mean, like, in coventry there's a lot of black people around,
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there's asian people around me, like, it's very diverse, but here it's not diverse. you're very aware that you are black, here, like, it's something that i realised in freshers' week, but that doesn't mean that you can't flourish. your environment can make things difficult for you, but it's not a barrier. you can overcome whatever you want to overcome and be who you need to be. it mightjust be a little bit more difficult, but that doesn't mean you can't do it. when we spoke to the vice chancellor stephen toope, he admitted that race was an issue that needed to be explored more. he even acknowledged stains of institutional racism. what needs to change, in light of everything that's happened over the summer? words, especially in this day and age, are very cheap. like, you can say something and, you know, if what you're saying appeases the masses, per se, at that time, then you can kind of get away with not doing anything. and i think that, for a very long time, powerful institutions, cambridge included, have fallen to that kind of standard. you know, they'll say something, and there will be no actionable plan in place,
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that's the next step. it's all well and good changing sentiments and feelings toward something, but if there's no practicality, if there's nothing that you apply to make black students feel, you know, more safe and more accepted in this community, then at the end of the day, you can't say we've made progress. now, of course, as well as lockdown, we've had black lives matter protests in the wake of the death of george floyd. as black students at cambridge, how are you feeling? it made me just become disillusioned with, like, almost everything. i think i'd been a person, initially, that had just trusted the system. even if it was implicitly, and i don't mean the system and, like the government, or something big, butjust, if you stick by the rules and
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just do what you need to do in the capacity that you can, then things will be fine. and it was like bit by bit, everything, no, actually, we've tidied our hair, we've spoken the way that we needed to speak, we've silenced elements of our culture, we've done this to accommodate in these spaces, and still that's not enough and still you're going to go on social media and still see people dying and still see... just like injustices everywhere and then having to confront that. i ended up feeling guilty, because, why did i tolerate so much, why did i think so many things, little micro—aggressions, little comments or little perspectives, like my place here in a sort of quote—unquote white country, there's more to be done and there's more that i can say and speak out about without feeling like i'm disrupting people or making people feel uncomfortable. that was really hard to deal with and i feel like if i was in cambridge, we would have our friends and acs and everything to be able to talk about it and share how we feel, but doing that on your own... lockdown in itself was hard, like mentally. that drained a lot of people, but then on
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top of that, with being black and seeing your people hurting was really, really hard to deal with in lockdown. outside of academics, i think acs will be a big part of my year this year and just, like, being able to create just an amazing space. covid or no covid, just because we've got such a huge intake of black freshers and ijust want them to be able tojust experience what we experienced.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: ahead of an announcement on new coronavirus restrictions — a final night out for some — and last minute meetings in government to iron out the details. a warning the country is at a tipping point in the fight against covid—19 from england's deputy chief medical officer, donald trump's doctors say he is no longer at risk of spreading coronavirus — but they don't say he is covid—free. it's one of the greatest rivalries in tennis history.. but who will take the title? rafa nadal and novak djokovic go head to head on men's final day at the french open. how are you? going out right now to
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mrs teres duncan. the dj who spent 50 years making a programme in his garage that only his wife could hear — finally gets a big break in america. light winds, fewer showers and plenty of sunshine. that is how sunday is shaping up. i will have all the details shortly. it's sunday october 11th. our top story: talks on tough new coronavirus restrictions for the worst hit parts of england will take place today. the discussions between the government and local leaders will be held ahead of an expected announcement on the new rules by the prime minister tomorrow. england's deputy chief medical officer has warned the country is at a "tipping point" in what he called "our national fight" against covid—19. as john mcmanus reports. it's been a tough year so far and it's understandable that people are keen to unwind. with further restrictions on socialisation looming, last night in liverpool, any were making the most of what may be a final weekend of partying —
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for now, at least. it seems that for some parts of the country, a difficult winter may be on the way and the government needs the public to co—operate. i think it could be managed a lot better. i don't think all this lockdown thing works, everybody going home at ten o'clock. i think it could be managed better. they haven't told any bars or that what to expect, so, as of monday, we're getting an announcement but we don't know what we're being announced to, you know, so it's kind of like, is everything going to be shut down or you just planning on closing certain things or what? nobody has any idea. i think we would support any measures that keep people safe but as long as business owners were supported by the government, we'd be happy with that. the expected new rules may have a particular impact on parts of the north of england because that's where infections are rising fastest. the details are still being finalised but they're expected to focus on a three—tier system. the worst affected areas could be
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subject to pub closures, restaurant restrictions and bans on indoor and outdoor mixing. but the mayors of some northern regions say the government's latest plans to support staff whose industries need to close don't go far enough. when the state says, "you may not go to work, you may not trade", then people should be getting 100% compensation. being paid two thirds your wages, especially if you're on minimum wage, is not acceptable. the political arguments are taking place against a backdrop of renewed warning about the virus. england's deputy chief medical officer, professor jonathan van—tam says the country's now at a similar point to where it was in march. that was when infections were rising and there were fears the nhs would be overwhelmed. but with better testing and treatment, he says history doesn't have to repeat itself. also key of course is controlling
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the rate of transmission. the prime minister's statement on monday is expected to point to how that might be achieved. john mcmanus, bbc news. let's speak now to our political correspondentjessica parker. jessica, what are they likely to be discussing? confusion in the north. it is like a long way to go with negotiations today? further conversations are expected today in downing street stop number ten keen to say —— ‘s look like they are engaging with local leaders. can they actually agree? this interesting to hear yesterday from mary of liveable city, joe anderson, he was suggesting that actually the decision for his area had already been made, that it would be put into the strict steer of restrictions and you could see things like pub closures. also, interestingly, we heard from the leader of the gateshead council —— that gateshead
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council yesterday he was saying he was resistant to further local restrictions in his area. he was pushing back on that because he wa nts to pushing back on that because he wants to see the current measures in place bed in before moving to something i can do hospitality closures. and then also of course, yesterday, we had this group of labour mayors saying the financial package to come alongside further restrictions just wasn't good enough, if you are on a minimum wage, they are saying that actually, surviving on two—thirds of your wages, it won't be possible for a lot of people to make ends meet. the government are saying they are offered up an unprecedented level of support package measures and this is just one element of that i think that rail could rumble on. at least tomorrow we will hear from the prime minister. he will stand up in the house of commons, outline this new tier system, talk about further restrictions so the millions of people who are waiting to see what the future holds don't have too much longer to wait now.
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president trump is no longer at risk of transmitting covid—19, according to the white house physician. earlier on saturday he delivered a speech from the white house balcony, in his first public event since being hospitalised, and told the crowd he was "feeling great". but, questions have been raised over the safety of the gathering, after pictures showed hundreds of people packed tightly together. a scottish mp who was suspended from the snp for taking a train from london to glasgow, after testing positive for covid—19, has said she won't resign. in an interview with the scottish sun on sunday, margaret ferrier said the virus made her act out of character. she added that her hard work and dedication shouldn't be wiped away by what she called an error ofjudgement. uk scientists have begun testing the bcg vaccine, which is usually used to protect against tuberculosis, to see if it could help treat covid—19. researchers believe that its effect on the immune system, could also be used to help fight coronavirus. thousands of people will now take part in a trial lead
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by the university of exeter, to test the theory. if the trial proved to be positive then this could be of huge importance globally because ecg, while we don't think it is not specific against covid, it has the potential to buy perhaps several yea rs of potential to buy perhaps several years of time for the covid vaccines to come through —— bcg. and perhaps other treatments to be developed. britain's got talent finally crowned its winner last night, after the pandemic caused a six month delay between broadcasting the auditions and the live shows. #it # it won't be long until these masks are gone and we will be living life again to the maximum! musical comedian jon courtenay became the first golden buzzer act
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to win the show and bagged himself a coveted slot at the royal variety performance and 250,000 pounds. not a bad day at the office. did you see him when the announcement was made? he fell to his knees and literally could not speak. congratulations to him. by all accounts, a really nice fellow, too. just what we need at the minute. there have been messages of praise and support for marcus rashford, who has been awarded an mbe for his work campaigning for free school meals. as we reported yesterday, the england and manchester united forward says he won't stop there. he told us he now wants help for poorer families to be extended even further. what i would like to do now when i'm in this position is directly to the prime minister and just really ask
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for the vouchers to be extended until, at least until october half term because i think that is what the families need. you know, speaking to them and knowing how much they have been helped and how much they have been helped and how much it is going to affect them if they don't have it. i think that's got to be my main focus now to get that message across. unstoppable. last night, rashford's england boss — gareth southgate, gave his response to the award. we are all very proud of him, we gave him a special round of applause this morning because i think is a group we're very close, we have watched him, iam group we're very close, we have watched him, i am saying grow up, but he is still 22, so yeah, you can only marvel at what he has achieved, really, and the difference he has made. some concerns have been raised over the practicalities of extending the provision of free school meals. last month, the mp for thirsk and malton, kevin hollinrake received criticism for questioning the scheme on twitter. hejoins us now.
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thank you for taking the time to talk to us. marcus rashford is now calling for the scheme to be extended through the october half term. would you support that? good morning. first of all, i would like to congratulate marcus rashford on his award, i think is fantastic because it we need to look at this in context. this is the first time ever any government has ever provided support through the summer holidays in this way and my point on social media that you referred to was this has to be paid for by the taxpayer and the wider you offer support, the less support you can give to those really, really in need and the reality is of covid, lots of people's incomes have been really badly hit by the crisis. some people's incomes have not been that badly hit. some have grown because they are working for a company that has actually done more business due to covid so my point was that really
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we should try and direct support at those most in need. are you suggesting therefore that it has been too broad, this support? potentially. what the chancellor did before marcus rashford intervened was put some money aside that was for people who had really been badly hit. what you do with this voucher scheme is expressed the benefit over such a wide population and it means that those whose incomes have really been badly hit potentially don't get as much and that is the concern i have. all of this has to be paid for by the taxpayer, of course, so we have to either spread the benefits more widely or we have to increase taxes if you are going to increase welfare which is what you are talking about was that i think we should have a sensible conversation about welfare meaning increased spending which means increased taxes. the national food strategy has come up with a 3—point plan
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which it exists necessary to try and help people. it would bring more people into the net. the government says it is working with the national food strategy. is this somebody not listening to what a group of experts have offered as a, are they not listening? don't think it is about not listening. the government has to make a difficult decision about spending taxpayer is not money and trying to find those in need, directing it to those most in need. i'm sure it will try and strike that balance but we don't have unlimited resources . balance but we don't have unlimited resources. as you know, the government will spend something like, including the reduction in tax receipts, the government will see, the tax pay—out‘s money, we will spend billions of dollars of taxpayers money which you don't have this year. it will increase the
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government debt. we have to bear this in mind when we're making these difficult decisions. the other thing i will say is this is a voucher scheme. i in principle have no issue making welfare system more attractive, increasing the provision of welfare, but i probably would prefer of welfare, but i probably would p refer to of welfare, but i probably would prefer to see the managers given to people in their payment rather than a voucher scheme. spending in the way that they see fit rather than a dictated doesn't the voucher showed that it -- dictated doesn't the voucher showed that it —— the voucher dictate it? i think they should spend the money they need to. people generally i think do the right thing to give the money in their hand and they can decide it how to spend it. if they can spend it more efficiently and effectively, that is a good thing.
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your tweet said it was apparent‘s job to feed their children. you had criticism about that but have you found people who agreed with you as well? an awful lot of people have. i understand in this world that people disagreed with you and you are wrong and now it seems people disagreed with you and you could be bad or evil. i was making a point that where parents are able to, it is primarily the parent's job to feed their children because i stand by that. i have a lot of people who have contacted me, both in the house of commons and outside of it who said absolutely right. that is got to bea said absolutely right. that is got to be a basic principle of personal responsibility and i think that cove rs responsibility and i think that covers being a parent as well as just you as an individual. in the wa ke just you as an individual. in the wake of that, marcus ratchet —— marcus rashford urged you to speak to families. have you spoken to any families caught up on this?” to families. have you spoken to any families caught up on this? i have spoken to many, many families on a weekly and annual basis, this is the life of an mp. you don't sit in the
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house of commons and simply pine on to —— theoretical concept. you go to foodbank, you meet with people, i often come into contact with people who are in difficult financial circumstances and i have often spoken out in the house of commons, trying to improve the system to make sure people are better looked after. indeed, , sure people are better looked after. indeed,, i have a great understanding on some of these issues and i welcome marcus's work in terms of trying to draw attention to this but the subsequent tweet i made was let's have a proper debate about this. i am very happy to engage with marcus rashford or anybody else on this to try and make sure we have a system that works as efficiently as possible and helps those most in need. so so with your poverty select committee at on, would you welcome
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marcus love will tear us apart speaking to mps. -- rashford. it's an open invitation. thank you very much for talking to us. let's check in with louise for a look at what the weather is got in store. how are you, louise. another beautiful autumn photograph behind me. i love this season. when we get some sunshine, you get to experience and enjoy the colours. moving off into scandinavia, still in the rinsing it further east. that means the further east you are, still likely to have a risk north—easterly breeze, perhaps driving it a few scattered showers along the north sea coast. further west, a bit more sunshine. showers
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today should be few and far between but still the wind direction, although light of the many, coming from the north. still on the cool side. that said, if you get a bit of shelter, you get sunshine coming through. 10— 15 degrees, the higher. make the most of it. more rain to come, as they move into monday, wetter weather across the country. that will slowly ease. something a bit brighterfor the that will slowly ease. something a bit brighter for the north that will slowly ease. something a bit brighterfor the north on tuesday. goodness knows we will need some sunshine half through the week. in the first update on president trump's health since thursday, the white house physician has said he is no longer at risk of transmitting coronavirus. on saturday, mr trump told hundreds of supporters from the balcony of the white house that he was "feeling great" and repeated his claim that a vaccine was "imminent".
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i want to know our nation is going to defeat this terrible china virus, as we call it. and we are producing powerful therapies and drugs and we are healing the sick and we are going to recover and the vaccine is coming out very, very quickly, in record time, as you know, it's coming out very soon, we have great, great companies doing it and distributing it and we will through our military very, very rapidly. but, the president has been criticised for not wearing a mask and there have been questions raised over the safety of the event after images showed several hundred people packed closely together. let's get the latest now from us political analyst eric ham, who's in washington. good morning. thank you forjoining us. no longer contagious but not necessarily covid—free. holding events like that, inviting people to gather closely together, how is that landing with the electorate? it's landing with the electorate? it's landing very powerfully with the
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president's base, seeing him on the campaign trail, speaking to supporters, that will certainly rile up supporters, that will certainly rile up his base and get them energised to get to the polls that it's those voters he needs to close the gap with joe voters he needs to close the gap withjoe biden where we could see him run into problems. people like senior citizens, suburban women and couege senior citizens, suburban women and college educated white men seeing the president could be a problem for the president could be a problem for the president could be a problem for the president particularly as he begins to head to key battleground states like pennsylvania, iowa and florida. worse they not concerned gathering people together, especially with what happened in minnesota? it is a good point and when you look at the minnesota gathering, but took place in the white house two weeks ago, deemed a super spreader by members of the president's own coronavirus task force, and seeing the president today, who many americans are still not sure if he is covid—free,
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speaking to those supporters, again, many americans think the president has failed on this virus and to see them holding an event for many of these voters, they will see that as reckless and dangerous and itjust doesn't send the right message at a time when the president needs to close the gap withjoe biden and has only less than 25 days to do so. he was targeted specifically in that speech, trying to engage black americans, latino americans, more of a social and economic campaign. is that more the way to go rather than talking about covid and is it landing with those communities? there is a lot of ground the president has to cover. the president has to cover. the president did particularly well with african—american men and latino men.
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what that doing, any slippage, so is got to make sure and what the president will be doing today and on monday, it's going to move many of those key supporters, which is why he is actually going to these three states. iowa is a state the president one in 2016. now it's trending towards joe biden. it'll be interesting to see how florida goes tomorrow. it's a state thatjoe biden hasn't one for 40 years. tomorrow. it's a state thatjoe biden hasn't one for 40 yearsm tomorrow. it's a state thatjoe biden hasn't one for 40 years. it is also committed to spending $6 million in taxes so if we go back to 2016, michigan, pennsylvania and wisconsin are the three states that
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president trump have turned from blue to red. no republican had done that since george hw bush in 1988. that's what we're seeing with texas and arizona and possibly north carolina so what president trump did with his hat—trick in 2016, joe biden is now trying to repeat that in 2020. it will send democrat to the white house. but audacious to go for those states. is it in the bag? it's never that simple. what we see with joe it's never that simple. what we see withjoe biden spending time in arizona and spending $6 million in taxes, clearly internal polling data showing him something that suggests these are states that he could turn from red to blue. that could be a
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turnup for the books. you might recall a lovely story from a couple of years ago about an amateur dj called deke duncan. he spent years broadcasting from his garden shed to just one loyal listener — his wife. in 2018 deke was picked up by bbc radio three counties — which gave him the chance to entertain listeners in the stevenage and luton area. now, like all great showbiz rags—to—riches tales — he's about to break america. we're joined now by deke from his home in stockport and his director, kevin peckham from wlha radio in wisconsin. it went right around the world all great showbiz tales, he's about to break the states. good morning, good to see you. and also his direct. kevin, good morning to you. thank
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you so much for taking the time to talk to us. i'm going to ask you, what was it about deke that made you wa nt to what was it about deke that made you want to snap up the hottest thing on british radio? we saw the 1974 video over here, he's almost as crazy as we are. we were mostly older broadcast guys and we're doing radio the way we to do it. that's amazing, how eccentric and then i saw the more recent one. we have to drag this guy down. great idea. just tell us, what happened. how did this connection come about? it came via social media but i got this message from kevin packham. i can't believe what i'm reading here. i said, look at this, there is an american radio
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station here that wants you to join. i immediately said, ok, iwill go for that. it's the end of a lifelong thing for me. absolutely super. steve na g e, thing for me. absolutely super. stevenage, stockport and now stateside. we saw pictures of your wife doing the hoovering. times have changed. your current wife is now your news editor, isn't that right? cheers, lady pamela. she is very good. tracking the progress of women. at this station. kevin, what was it, obviously it was something about deke that caught your eye. what is your radio station like, how is he making a contribution? we are unusual. deke group ata contribution? we are unusual. deke group at a time when it was fast paced and there was a lot of craft. notjust paced and there was a lot of craft. not just playing paced and there was a lot of craft. notjust playing music, there was a
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lot associated with it. in our case, you might be the last one standing but we're the ones do that. we all grew up listening to radio that way. there have been practising for 50 years. i think is good enough. he's ready for the big time. and he is ready for the big time. and he is ready for the big time. and he is ready for us. this is opportunity for us to ring another one around. nowadays, it no longer matters. all across the us. now we have one on another side of the globe. will pamela still be involved then? pamela still be involved then? pamela will always be involved. along show —— alongside mies shows with w lha. along show —— alongside mies shows with w lha. you're not going to develop an american accent? no, no.
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iam develop an american accent? no, no. i am british. develop an american accent? no, no. iam british. and having develop an american accent? no, no. i am british. and having a jolly good time. deke, what in your view with your experience, what is the secret of a good radio show? the secret of a good radio show? the secret is to be a discjockey rather than a presenter. there is kind of a difference. it's welding the songs together with interesting rapid chat that kind of makes the whole thing flow endlessly. bouncing along from one record to another. it's a lovely experience. it's the old style. if it ain't broke, why fix it? are you nervous about broadcasting? are you planning what you're next records are going to be? i never do that. i don't have a playlist. i take a stack of songs into the studio and just select them as i go. itjust
quote quote quote
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has to feel right, that one next, that one after that. it's kind of constructive. what time of day is this going to be? you are up in the middle of the night. it will be 4pm today. that's 10am middle of the night. it will be 4pm today. that's10am central us time. six hours behind us. maybe you could doa six hours behind us. maybe you could do a you are obviously in your studio. it will be able to hear the jingles and here 20 of them. go on.
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playing them, deke playing them is much more exciting. that's fantastic. williams. how does that feel, deke, it's not radio 77 anymore, it is wlha. it'sjust wonderful, it's the end of a dream, the ultimate dream. now, here i am right there. this is so cool. brilliant. four o'clock this afternoon when you go on air, fingers crossed, thank you for getting up early to talk to us and thank you for staying up late to talk to us as well in the states. and congratulations on signing the hottest uppity in british radio, someone has finally done it. recognising that talent. thank you to both of you. i like his attitude. what is your first record going to
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be? don't know, wait and see. it's 730. coming up in the next hour, running a marathon is hard enough — but what about running it 1,000 miles underground? we chat to the fundraisers who have taken on the challenge. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news.
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plans for tougher coronavirus restrictions for the worst hit parts of england, will be finalised today. discussions between the government and local leaders will be held ahead of an expected announcement on the new rules by the prime minister tomorrow. meanwhile, england's deputy chief medical officer warned the country is at a "tipping point", in what he called "our national fight" against covid—19. president trump is no longer at risk of transmitting covid—19, according to the white house physician. earlier on saturday he delivered a speech from the white house balcony, in his first public event since being hospitalised, and told the crowd he was "feeling great". but, questions have been raised over the safety of the gathering, after pictures showed hundreds of people packed tightly together. a scottish mp who was suspended from the snp for taking a train from london to glasgow, after testing positive for covid—19, has said she won't resign. in an interview with the scottish sun on sunday, margaret ferrier said the virus made her act out of character. she added that her hard work and dedication shouldn't be wiped away by what she called
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an error ofjudgement. staff and pupils at a primary school on the wirral say the building is unfit for 21st century education and are pleading with the government for more funding, so they can carry out urgent repairs. they say children have been forced to wear coats indoors because of problems with the heating, and last week parts of the ceiling fell down during heavy rainfall. as part of their campaign, some year 6 pupils made a video to highlight the challenges they're facing. let's take a look. if the lights go off in broad daylight, this corridor is dark. when it rains, it leaks in several places. when it is cold, we have these two heaters that are ineffective. in winter, we wear our coats in class. the main building in
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my school were built in 1873. these are one of the original boilers and if one of them raked, parts are not available to fix it. i love pe but we can't play ball games in here anymore, it is dangerous as the ceiling tiles fall off. we're joined now by the head teacher of riverside primary school — christina lahive. it sounds like your building is falling apart, to put it bluntly. yes. due to the age of the building, we are constantly faced with the challenges that that brings and as you can appreciate, over time, we have been patching things up and it is very frustrating, very expensive. we have limped on valiantly but we have come to a point where it is just not acceptable anymore. why is it you have decided to use the children to try and get your message through to the prime minister?|j through to the prime minister?” don't know whether it was that we decided all the children decided.
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the pupil voice is very strong at riverside and we are all about the curriculum, making films, and it was during a student council meeting that the children said, could we make a film about it? we were having so many meetings about how we can improve our building and they took over. the protest with the coats on the railings, that is all designed to raise the profile? absolutely. this is our wonderful parent power, mr parsons and his crew because sometimes the children have had to wear the coats inside the building. the council, as i understand it, is in the process of trying to sell an old school that is now being closed. when that sale goes through, that will release some funds that the local council can then hopefully released to help sort things out for you? this released to help sort things out for you ? this may released to help sort things out for you? this may yet move without the government having to intervene? well, the local authority are as
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frustrated as we are and there has been a series of unfortunate events, funding cuts from central government and as you have just said, waiting for these receipts from the sale of land. however, the la are helping us but these are just short—term solutions. they have made the most magnificent plans for state—of—the—art building to go across, looking over the liverpool skyline but unfortunately, these plans are still to leave the drawing board. you are not alone in a school that has problems. many schools are in older welding is now. why do you think you deserve special treatment over any other school?” think you deserve special treatment over any other school? i think over time because we have been promised a new build, much—needed investment in school has been withheld with the prospect of this new build because there are so many things in our building, it is notjust one thing, it isa building, it is notjust one thing, it is a leaking roof, the lack of natural light, whole sports
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facilities. last week we couldn't have hot meals stop it is just one thing after another and as you say, we have had some resources getting to us but because the building, one side is a victorian building and the other is the 70s. both of them are not acceptable for our children. interesting that the victorian building has probably stood the test of time, albeit it is much older, but perhaps better than the 19705 building. what problems are the children finding? obviously having to work home if the boiler breaks down but what impact doe5 to work home if the boiler breaks down but what impact does at having on their education? well, despite all these things, the children at riverside are doing very, very well. we area riverside are doing very, very well. we are a very creative school, we are upfor we are a very creative school, we are up for lots of different awards and our school is a beautiful, happy place to land and despite the surroundings. and this is what they
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we re surroundings. and this is what they were saying, if they can do this on these poor conditions and they are terrible conditions, i know you said that lots of schools, i think we mu5t that lots of schools, i think we must be top of the list. for the state of our building. if we can achieve this in these facilities, what can we achieve in proper 5tate—of—the—art 21st—century ready facilities? you are shortlisted for aan facilities? you are shortlisted for a an education supplement creative school of the year. how proud are you of your staff and pupils for what they have achieved? well, we are triple winners for the educational awards for the education and arts in a primary school and this year, as you said, we have been shortlisted for an award. creativity is at the heart of everything we do at riverside and i could not be more proud of the children all the staff. well, we wish you all the best and we are very grateful to you for talking to us bright and early this morning. christina, the head of
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riverside primary in wirral. the authority has been allocated money to develop the plans for structural and building works and also issue a heating, ventilation, kitchen appliances. they say they have already invested £400,000 of the department for education grant into riverside primary as we were hearing from christina just then. it shows with all of the confusion around covid, those old problems around funding are still there, nothing has gone away, has it? let us check in with holly for a look at the sport. the guest —— the gift that keeps on giving. those two are at it again! it is about getting that overall title of the greatest of all time. that is what we are really vying for and this is another sequel coming up in what is already a gripping saga. novak djokovic and rafa nadal clash
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in another grand slam final. there's more than just the french open title at stake here. a win for nadal would see him equal roger federer‘s all time men's record of 20, but world number one djokovic is hot on his heels, chasing his 18th major title. and this is a player in form at the moment, but he knows it's never easy taking on the man they call — "king of the clay". it is the biggest obstacle and challenge you can have. this is what it comes down to. i have been there. i have done it, i understand what needs to be done and how i need to prepare myself so i'm looking forward to it. well, from djokovic's 17 grand slams to this woman's very first. what a moment for polish teenager iga swiatek who beat australian open champion sophia kenin to claim the women's final yesterday.
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19 years old — she's the lowest ranked woman to win at roland garros. and she did so convincingly. she didn't drop a set during the entire tournament. apparentlyjust a week ago, she had been unsure whether she would commit to tennis long—term or go to university. and britain's alfie hewett completed a perfect french open, claiming his fourth grand slam wheelchair singles title. he also won the doubles title on friday with gordon reid. exeter look to be picking up where saracens left off — becoming the dominant club in english rugby.. they're still on for a domestic and european double. they're favourites for the premiership final in a fortnight after brushing aside bath in their playoff semi final. it's the fifth straight season the chiefs have made the twickenham showpiece. it'll be a repeat of the 2017 final after wasps beat bristol in the other semi. head coach lee blackett says they'll have to keep their emotions in check
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in a fortnight as they chase a first title in 12 years. as the english season draws to a close, the pro14 is already under way where cardiff made it two wins from two with victory over connaught. elsewhere ulster beat ospreys, while edinburgh lost to munster. lewis hamilton has another chance to equal michael schumacher‘s record 91 formula 1 victories later today. he starts from second on the grid at the eifel grand prix. his mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas was quarter of a second quicker around germany's nurburgring, ending hamilton's run of five poles in a row. however, all is not lost for hamilton as four of the last five winners at this circuit have started from second on the grid. britain's alex dowsett won stage eight of the giro d'italia. the time—trial specialist broke away with 11 miles to go, and held on to win
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the stage by over a minute. he rides for the israel start—up nation team, who chris froome isjoining next year. portugal'sjoao almeida still leads overall. all four home countries are in nations league action today. the third round of fixtures. england have the toughest game against belgium. gareth southgate welcomes back tammy abraham and jadon sancho. they missed the win against wales after breaking covid—19 rules at a party last weekend. they have obviously missed a bit of training so that's a bit of a concern in terms of their load through the week but no, the situation is done. they are back with the group and we move forward. round of the pga championship at wentworth. although most people seem to be more
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concerned about his attire, this hoodie, than his golf on social media.. it prompted a bit of a debate on acceptable dress codes. he's not worried though — he made an eagle and three birdies on his way to 14 under par for a three shot lead going into the final round later. he's taken to twitter to defend his outfit choice, saying it should be embraced rather then sneered at. maybe there is something in it, though. and another englishman pleased with his day isjordan smith. a hole in one from 139 yards on the par—three second hole. it took him a while before he realised though. listen... i was just about to say we have all been there. i have never been there. but it is just brilliant, the moment it takes him to realise. actually asks the question, did it, did it, did it go in? here's louise with your
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weather forecast. let us see what the weather is looking like. finally first whether watcher of the day and it shows the story quite dutifully. this is actually norfolk. as you can see quite clearly, some brightness but i suspect these lines will be on full at the moment. the isobars just squeezed together. opening up under the influence of high pressures quite a story. more in the way, dry, sunny weather. generally it's acquired story across the country. most of the showers will run on along the east coast. it's a dry, settle been for many. that means a little more sunshine. but still, the wind coming from the
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north. that means the temperatures will be just below the average for the time of year. we are expecting highs this afternoon of10— the time of year. we are expecting highs this afternoon of 10— 15 degrees. get out and enjoy because the story is set to change as we move into monday. we will start to see the first signs of that rain arriving through this evening and overnight, pushing into northern ireland and western scotland. this waterfront will drift south and east. clear skies, temperatures down into low single figures, maybe the south—east corner that's where we will start off with early morning sunshine. early birds will have the treat first thing. the fun starts to move south across the country during monday. some of that rain will be a nuisance and fairly slow—moving and under the cloud and rain, the temperatures will struggle. early morning bright is clouding over through the south—east, eventually the rain arriving by the end of the david at the same time, and movement into western scotland and northern
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ireland. sunshine coming through but if you are under the bulk of this wet weather, temperatures perhaps 9— 10 degrees. that weatherfront slowly drifts south and east, still tending to linger across central and southern areas tuesday. bringing the risk of showery up weeks of rain. the best of the dry weather on tuesday, for scotland and northern ireland, the wind direction coming, starting to swing around, so temperatures still going to be a little down where they should be. top temperatures 10—12 or 13 degrees. best of the sunshine through the stages of the week. dry settled and stunning. particularly warm with it. we will be grateful for some warm weather in the north especially can't go to the pub anymore. we still don't know the
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details. we'll be speaking to the of tyneside. an talking to us about exams, the possibility of what might happen with exams. different situations in different parts of the country. a trial using bcg, the vaccine to stop tb which might have some kind of positive effect on covid—19. some kind of positive effect on covid-19. did you watch the final of britain's. talent? it's a 2020 moment, comedy song is all about the situations we've got ourselves in, we are all in it together and we will get through this, it was just what we needed. it's time now for the latest technology news, with this week's click.
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hey, welcome to click. hope you're doing ok. it's been nearly seven months now since we all packed up our camera kits on this programme and took them home. even back in march we were being told we needed to get ready for the long haul, but i'm not sure many of us were able to mentally prepare for that properly. how are you doing, lara? well, i can't believe it has been that long already. i think there's a strange sense of us restarting this again. i suppose things had got a little bit back to normal but now we know we will be continuing for quite a while. one thing that i am starting to feel better about, though, and i think quite a few other people may be as well, is starting to differentiate between home and work life,
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even though it's all happening in one place. yeah, it is tricky to get the boundaries right though, i have to say. for example this is what happens at my place every week. i have to take over the entire living room and then we have these loud script meetings somewhere else in the house beforehand. of course working from home can mean a lot of video calls, and that puts you at the mercy of meetings being interrupted by the dreaded free... er, yeah, that. which is really annoying when the person speaking was about to make a brilliant point. i think what lara was about to say is that chris fox has found a new way to keep talking even when your internet isn't playing ball. hi everyone, thanks forjoining today's video call, hopefully you don't notice anything unusual about my face — because this isn't technically a live video of me, in fact i am not even looking at the camera, i'm using computer trickery to make it look like i am. what you've just seen is one of several tools being developed by nvidia, the graphics card maker that it hopes will change video calling and make it possible even on really slow internet connections
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like at my mum and dads house. streaming video can use a lot of bandwidth so the idea here is to send just a few key components instead, a reference image of the caller and tracking data capturing their facial expressions. these can be recompiled at the other end, closely matching the originalfootage. this is still in development. it only works if you have a static background and there are a few times where my avatar looked a bit weird, but this is using a fraction of the data that video calling would. nvidia says this technique uses about 3 kilobits per second of video, although, obviously, you'd have to layer audio on top of that too. the other benefit is that they can use face tracking data for other things like animating a avatar in real—time for you to use in your video call, although i'd
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probably choose a more exciting design than this. i've been told on twitter it makes me look like jacob rees—mogg. they can also use face tracking data to change the direction you're looking so that you're facing the camera. the question is, is this me? i mean, it looks like me and it is controlled by me but it's not me, it's more of a puppet of me, isn't it? to get philosophical i called nvidia's richard kerriss and asked him whether using avatars like this might make video calls less personal. well, hopefully not. hopefully it's driven by you or driven by me and we would then be the puppetmaster, in your analogy, but i think it's, you know, if i can have a better experience in my conversation with you by having a clearer picture and less diversions of things, whether it's noise or video backgrounds and stuff, i think that helps personalise it more. we've seen the capabilities of deep fakes and the kind of things people use it for, isn't there the possibility that people might
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use this kind of technology for dishonest purposes? good question. but that's not our intent. our intent is really to improve the workflows that people deal with on a given basis, and, look, there will always be ways that people can — you can make movies of yourselfjust by doing this. i've seen kids in school doing that, my daughter, someone got in trouble at school because they made a rather lengthy loop of them paying attention in class. there will always be that kind of stuff but that is not our intent. nvidia hopes its tools will be integrated into the big video calling platforms. the first one to sign on as avaya. and we are seeing ai tools creep into our video calling software, we have noise suppression in zoom and eyeline correction in apple's facetime. but, for me, the one a! feature i hope they can add next is one that can eliminate unnecessary video calls. that was chris. now, one of the companies that has had huge success during the pandemic is zoom. it may have been founded in 2011 but it's only really been since march this year that saying
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you're zooming someone has become part of everyday conversation. so spencer has caught up with harry moseley, the company's chief information officer, to find out a little bit more about the zoom boom and how he perceives the future of work. the world changed for pretty much everyone in march and suddenly most of the world seemed to want to conduct video conferencing en masse. i would imagine that the world changed for zoom pretty drastically at that point, yeah? one could say so, i mean if you go back to december 2019, we had north of 10 million daily participants on the platform, in march it went to 200 million people, and in april it shot up to over 300 million daily participants on the platform. i want to talk about your virtual background, because that's the thing that's just amazed so many people. can you explain what's going on,
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because it looks to me like it's trying to find the human being, and as i move different objects across my body you can see it kind of removes them, which is very... it obviously knows that that is not part of a hand, that cup is not part of my body and so it's removing it from my hand. what is going on? it's mapping out my body, it's so it can recognise my face and...and it's also focused on this room. but, typically, when you walk backwards into the virtual background, you actually disappear into the virtual background, i don't know if you've noticed that. yep, yeah. because it's...the camera seeing, you know, sort of, it's seeing the physical presence and then it's...but then it can't see it because it's out of the range and then it sort of lays over the virtual background. it's pretty clever stuff.
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now, over the past few years we've found ourselves spending more and more time inside food computers. now, these mainly involve growing food in special nutrient mixes inside shipping containers. you may remember the strawberries that we saw in paris and the delicious salad that i tried in los angeles. the idea is to both precisely control the growing conditions, but also produce food closer to where it's going to be consumed. but now there's a new idea. it's not about growing fruit or vegetable, but insects. paul carter has been to find out more and filed this bug report. rooster crows wood farm. a family run business in the green fields of cambridgeshire. home to fourth—generation farmers charles and joe, a flock of 28,000 free
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range chickens, and, now, 6 million wriggling black soldier fly larvae. don't worry, these are for the hens. winner, winner, chickens' dinner. oh, my god, there's millions in there. you don't need to stick your hand... you don't need to touch it. i don't want to touch it any more than you do. i really don't want to touch it. no. the chickens here are used to eating locally milled wheat. sounds delicious. but now home—grown insects are on the menu, thanks to this ai—connected containerfarm. it's a system which allows by—products to be upcycled on site into high—quality, high—protein animal feed. the climate—controlled system is made up of trays stacked on robotic rollers. each holds around 20,000 larvae,
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which get their own snacks from liquid feed. all this is controlled by a panel on the wall with an app also in development. typically, industrial—scale insect farms grow and process larvae onsite, before shipping to customers. better origin, the university of cambridge spin—out behind this trial, say they want to democratise insect production to farmers themselves. if you think of feed, right, it travels a very long distance to get to the point of farm. soy usually travels from brazil, ok? by putting a system on site, you dramatically cut down on all that food miles. not only that, you can do it vertically. but the smartest bit of all this is the ai that's monitoring the bugs. a combination of sensors speak with each other, sharing data around temperature, humidity, ph, and motion. computer vision systems analyse how quickly they consume their food and how much they're moving. this information is put through a neural network to detect how each tray of insects is performing, if they need more
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less food, and if they are healthy or not, so the farmer can intervene. of course, the main thing for farmers like charles is that it is easy to use, and results in happy hens. the trials that we've done, we have seen that the gut health on the bird has been fantastic. we've seen that feather coverage has been fantastic. so all round, we think it's probably the best enrichment we've ever come across. now, it wouldn't be click if i didn't familiarise myself with the grubs, and get in with the hens, who've been hiding inside the barn from the rain. try and get in before they get out. come on, girls. it's grubs up for the chickens, quite literally. i've never seen anything like it. they love it. they're pecking my feet. it's a good job i don't have feet.
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that was paul with 12,000 of his new best friends. anyone needs any eggs, by the way, paul's your man. now, that's it for the shortcut version of click. the full length version is, of course, waiting for you right now on iplayer. and as ever, you can keep up the team throughout the week on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching, and we'll see you soon. bye— bye.
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good morning and welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: ahead of an announcement on new coronavirus restrictions, a final night out for some and last—minute meetings in government to iron out the details. a warning the country is at a tipping point in the fight against covid—19 from england's deputy chief medical officer. donald trump's doctors say he is no longer at risk of spreading coronavirus — but they don't say he is covid—free. can a decades—old vaccine against tb help today's doctors beat the spead of coronavirus?
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it's one of the greatest rivalries in tennis history, but who will take the title? rafa nadal and novak djokovic go head to head on men's final day at the french open. good morning. lighter winds, fewer showers and plenty of sunshine. that's how sunday's shaping up. i'll have all the details coming up very shortly. good morning. it's sunday october 11th. our top story. talks on tough new coronavirus restrictions for the worst—hit parts of england will take place today. discussions between the government and local leaders will be held ahead of an expected announcement on the new rules by the prime minister tomorrow. england's deputy chief medical officer has warned the country is at a "tipping point" in what he called "our national fight" against covid—19. as john mcmanus reports.
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it's been a tough year so far, and it's understandable that people are keen to unwind. with further restrictions on socialisaing looming, last night in liverpool, any were making the most of what may be a final weekend of partying — for now, at least. it seems that for some parts of the country, a difficult winter may be on the way, and the government needs the public to co—operate. i think it could be managed a lot better. i don't think all this lockdown thing works, everybody going home at ten o'clock. i think it could be managed better. they haven't told any bars or that what to expect, so, as of monday, we're getting an announcement but we don't know what we're being announced to, you know, so it's kind of like, is everything going to be shut down or are you just planning on closing certain things or what? nobody has any idea. i think we would support any measures that keep people safe, but as long as business owners were supported by the government, we'd be happy with that. the expected new rules may have a particular impact on parts of the north of england, because that's where infections
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are rising fastest. the details are still being finalised, but they're expected to focus on a three—tier system. the worst affected areas could be subject to pub closures, restaurant restrictions and bans on indoor and outdoor mixing. but the mayors of some northern regions say the government's latest plans to support staff whose industries need to close don't go far enough. when the state says, "you may not go to work, you may not trade", then people should be getting 100% compensation. being paid two thirds your wages, especially if you're on minimum wage, is not acceptable. the political arguments are taking place against a backdrop of renewed warning about the virus. england's deputy chief medical officer, professor jonathan van—tam, says the country's now at a similar point to where it was in march. that was when infections were rising and there were fears the nhs would be overwhelmed. but with better testing
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and treatment, he says history doesn't have to repeat itself. also key, of course, is controlling the rate of transmission. the prime minister's statement on monday is expected to point to how that might be achieved. john mcmanus, bbc news. let's speak now to our political correspondentjessica parker. let's pick up on that point from the report, jessica. do we know what they are likely to bring in?” report, jessica. do we know what they are likely to bring in? i think we have had a few clues over recent days as to what may happen, and discussions as you guys have said are going to carry on with local leaders today. downing street very keen to be seen to be engaging with those local leaders going forward. but i think there is a question as to whether they will be able to ee, to whether they will be able to agree, and! to whether they will be able to agree, and i say we have heard from agree, and i say we have heard from a few of them, liverpool leaders have been told that the city will go to the strictest tear of
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restrictions, tier three, and that could mean pub closures, but also we have heard from the leader of gateshead council, who was making it clear he was rather resistant to any further restrictions in his area. he wa nts to further restrictions in his area. he wants to see the current measures bed in, he thinks there are promising signs in terms of the infection rates. and we heard from the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, yesterday, and he said discussions were ongoing as to what tier manchester may end up in. the prime minister tomorrow will make a statement to the house of commons, so things should be clearer then we will get the exact details of what these tiers will look like. meanwhile, as john was these tiers will look like. meanwhile, asjohn was reporting there, there is this other discussion or even route going on about the level of accompanying financial support. people like andy burnham, the labour mayor of greater manchester, say that if you are on the minimum wage, getting two thirds of your wage if your business is forced to close, some people are just not going to be able to make ends meet on that, for example if
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they are on the minimum wage currently. i think that row will continue, but in terms of what restrictions will look like the different areas of england, we should learn more about tomorrow, so all those millions of people waiting to find out more don't have too long to find out more don't have too long to wait now. jessica, thank you. president trump is no longer at risk of transmitting covid—19 to others, acording to the white house physician. earlier on saturday mr trump delivered a speech from the balcony of the white house, and told hundreds of cheering supporters that he was "feeling great". but there has been criticism over a lack of social distancing. our north america correspondent, david willis has the latest. ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states. the defiant removal of the facemask, a message to the faithful that their man is back. first of all, i'm feeling great. i don't know about you. how is everyone feeling? cheering
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a much anticipated memo from the president's doctor confirmed the leader of the free world is no longer a risk to others. now at day ten from symptom onset, wrote dr sean conley, fever—free for over 24 hours, and all symptoms improved, the assortment of advanced diagnostic tests obtained reveal there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus. not that the possibility of the president's continued contagion seemed to worry those that packed the south lawn of the white house several hours earlier. there were masks, yes, but little sign of social distancing. although the sea of maga caps might tell you otherwise, that was not a campaign event, according to the administration. it was, however, part of an attempt to woo black and latino voters, a group adversely affected by the coronavirus. yet despite the president's dog in existence that it is disappearing, at least half a dozen states are now recording record numbers of cases of the coronavirus. this is the single
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most important election in the history of our country. get out and vote, and i love you. thank you. cheering after more than a week's co nvalescence, after more than a week's convalescence, the president is now hoping to make up for lost time, hitting the campaign trail hard in the next days, with events planned in the swing states of florida, pennsylvania and iowa. withjust in the swing states of florida, pennsylvania and iowa. with just 22 days to go before the election. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. a scottish mp who was suspended from the snp for taking a train from london to glasgow, after testing positive for covid—19, has said she won't resign. in an interview with the scottish sun on sunday, margaret ferrier said the virus made her act out of character. she added that her hard work and dedication shouldn't be wiped away by what she described as an error ofjudgement. britain's got talent finally
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crowned its winner last night, after the pandemic caused a six—month delay between broadcasting the auditions and the live shows. # and it won't be long before the masks of gone # will be living life again to the maximum... musical comedian jon courtenay became the first golden buzzer act to win the show and bagged himself a coveted slot at the royal variety performance and £250,000. a clever song, feel good, family viewing. and a nice bloke. hejust couldn't believe that he had won, just what we need at the moment. it is ten past eight, almost.
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after the disruption and chaos of the summer's exam season, some parents, pupils and teachers are concerned about the impact of the pandemic on next year's assessments. an announcement on what will happen to england's exam schedule in 2021 is expected in the coming days. it follows scotland's decision to cancel their national 5 exams — the equivalent to gcse‘s. robert halfon is the chair of the education select committee and joins us now. good morning. is the simplest thing for england to follow scotland, to go with assessments on teachers recommendations, because we can't fairly go ahead with exams not knowing how much teaching time is going to be lost? what i hope think, andi going to be lost? what i hope think, and i have urge the government to do this, is to carry out an urgent assessment on all the pupils and the relative school years so that they can understand how much catch up is needed by the students and how much learning has been lost over the past six months, they should do that in conjunction with schools, collect
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the data, and then make an urgent decision as to whether or not exams will take place, or whether there will take place, or whether there will be a mixed version. there might be an option of doing the core subjects and then assessed grades for the other subjects. or a plan b, what happens if children are sent home, and how are they going to continue their learning and what is going to happen to the syllabus and other things? the government needs to a nswer other things? the government needs to answer these questions. the problem is there are so many variables among the things you have just described. would it not be simpler, therefore, to say scotland have, we are not having exams this year? in an idealworld, we would still go ahead with exams. they are very important to children. i do think there is time if the government make an announcement over the next week or so as to what the situation is, what the plan b is, as i have just situation is, what the plan b is, as i havejust mentioned, and i think possibly you could have a mixed version, as i say, doing the core
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subjects for exams and maybe assessment for everything else. but we do need a decision quite urgently. you said that the decision must come by october. is that looking likely? i was told that there might be a statement about this in the house of commons last week, that hasn't happened. i hope very much the government will announce if not this week then at least next week as to what the plans are. i hope that the assessment of children in collaboration with schools and the department for education has been going on, because the government need to knowjust how much learning as needed given what has gone on in the past six months with so many children are not in school. all the while, there are huge applications for young people wondering whether their mock exams are mock exams at all, wondering whether their summer is going to be eaten into, having to do exams later. to thing the government is
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taking seriously the applications for young people? i hope so, because i visit schools often and i speak to the students, and normally get questions about kinds of things, but the last couple of schools i visited, all the students wanted to ask me was whether or not exams were going to go ahead. it is causing enormous anxiety amongst students, causing problems for the teaching profession and the support staff. so we do need a decision very soon. our exa m we do need a decision very soon. our exam is going to take place? are they going to be delayed? and could there be a mixed version? if there is going to be school closures or bubbles going home, what is the plan bto bubbles going home, what is the plan b to ensure that those students are still learning? teachers we are hearing from talking about the impossibility of planning around this at the moment. they want to know that a decision is going to be taken quickly. we were expecting one last week. what are you saying to the government about moving forward on this? i have urged, back since
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september, that this assessment would take place with schools and the department for education, of stu d e nts the department for education, of students who are in exam years, so we know how much loss learning there has been and how much catch up is needed, and we need to be clear from the government to have a plan a, whether exams are taking place and whether exams are taking place and whether or not there is a plan b, if there are more closures or tougher restrictions across the country over the next few weeks. ok, robert halfon, thank you very much for joining us this morning. we await a decision. it isjust joining us this morning. we await a decision. it is just approaching quarter past eight. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. is that what it's like in leeds this morning? it is lovely, isn't it? i am hoping that mrs b and dog are
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telling the truth! for many of us, it will be a quieter day than yesterday, but there are still a few showers, most of them running down through the north sea coast. we also have one or two showers on the coast of wales at the moment. the further west you are, you are under this high pressure, so it will be quieter across the country with lighter winds. as you can see, the show is just drifting down through the north sea, affecting the east coast, and one or two across north wales at the moment, but there is also going to be some sunshine through the day today, a quiet day, still the wind coming from the north, although a lighter breeze than yesterday, but temperatures are still going to be a little subdued because of the northerly source. we are likely to see highs of 10—15 degrees through the southwest in the afternoon. i hope you can get out and make the most of it, because there is some rain to come in the forecast for the start of a new working week. it sta rts start of a new working week. it starts off in the far north—west as you can see quite clearly, so cloud will gather through the latter
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stages of today, bringing rain into western fringes of scotland and northern ireland overnight. we will see some clearer skies across east anglia and the south—east, and here we could see temperature balloon down into low figures, so actually start to monday morning. it will cloud over quite quickly through the north, and the win source coming from the north—westerly, so a coolidge feel yet again, particularly if you are caught under that rain for much of the day. so we start off bright, but clouding over in the south—east, and an improving picture into western scotland and northern ireland by the middle of the afternoon. but only around nine or10 the afternoon. but only around nine or 10 degrees under the cloud and the rain, maximum temperature is perhaps on monday 13, so disappointing. the frontal system ta kes disappointing. the frontal system takes its time to clear, they will bea takes its time to clear, they will be a curl of cloud and rain drifting south, and that will move its way
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through northern england, the midlands and the south on tuesday. the best of the drier weather for tuesday looks likely to be into scotla nd tuesday looks likely to be into scotland and northern ireland. the wind direction coming from a north—easterly, so again a coolidge source through the day, and the temperatures are likely to struggle, again we are looking at around 10—12 or 13 celsius is a maximum. but it does look as though from wednesday onwards an area of high pressure will build and quieten things down, so if you are after some dry and settled weather after this week, wednesday, thursday and potentially friday and into the weekend, it looks likely to be a little quieter. there we go. louise, thank you very much. wednesday looks like a cracking day, doesn't it? you are watching brea kfast. doesn't it? you are watching breakfast. it is 8.17. the bcg vaccine has been protecting millions of children worldwide against tuberculosis for nearly a century — but scientists are now hoping it may help to save lives from covid—19. researchers believe the vaccine causes wide—spread changes to the immune system, which could help in the protection
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against other infections like coronavirus. now a uk—based trial is being launched to test the theory. here's our health and science correspondent james gallagher. in the fight against covid, scientists are turning to one of our oldest vaccines. a new preventive weapon has now joined the battle. bcg vaccine. the bcg jab was designed to fight tuberculosis, and was first trialled in 1921. it's since been given to hundreds of millions of people. but now doctors think its effect on the immune system may lessen the impact of coronavirus too. sam hilton is a gp. hisjob, dealing with patients, puts him at high risk of getting covid. he's one of a thousand people in the uk, including care home staff and other health care workers, who will take part in the trial. having had the vaccine in childhood will not offer protection today. there's quite a good theory behind
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why the bcg vaccine might make you less unlikely to get unwell when you get covid. so i guess i see it as a potential for me to be protected a bit, which means i'm more likely to be able to come to work this winter. sam will get either the bcg jab or a dummy injection. then researchers will wait to see if the vaccine either alters the odds of getting covid or the severity of the infection. the data collected here in exeter will be combined with studies in australia, the netherlands, spain and brazil. there's no evidence bcg will help in the pandemic, so why do researchers think it might? this seems odd. vaccines are supposed to protect against one specific infection, so why might a tuberculosis jab also have a benefit in coronavirus? well, there's some interesting science that suggests that vaccines may have a wide effect across the whole of the immune system that may give our bodies an edge against other viruses and infections too.
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and indeed, in trials with the bcg jab, there has been a fall in death rates from other infections after people were vaccinated. the world health organization says the bcg jab might help bridge the gap until the dedicated coronavirus vaccine is developed. this could be of huge importance globally, because bcg, whilst we don't think it is... it's not specific against covid, but it has the potential to buy perhaps several years of time for the covid vaccines to come through, and perhaps other treatments to be developed. there are ten coronavirus vaccines in the final phase of testing, but none has yet been proven effective. james gallagher, bbc news. let's have a chat to our gp this morning. dr william bird joins let's have a chat to our gp this morning. drwilliam birdjoins us from reading. is the bcg vaccine
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going to be a solution, do you think, or will itjust bias a bit of time the? it is very exciting. it is going to buy some time. it is not the cure, as they said. it gets the immune system just to get that extra edge on it to stop the virus coming m, edge on it to stop the virus coming in, but also if a virus does come m, in, but also if a virus does come in, the bcg appears to be able to make sure the immune system responds to it. and bizarrely, as it is mentioned, there are about 200 other infections that bcg could be used, and some viewers will also notice they have got bcg when they have bladder cancer, it is used for that as well, so it is incredible vaccine. but it won't be a vaccination against covid, it will buy some time to allow the immune system to build up so that we don't get such a bad infection, and that will reduce death rates without any doubt. this is actually one of 22 trials going on in the world with this very fact of using bcg, so
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obviously there is a lot of excitement about it. and it is not the only drug being used for something else which is now being brought in to help in the battle against coronavirus, is it? no, dexamethasone is used to huge amount, we use it for children with croup, if a child comes in out of hours with lots of stridor, then dexamethasone is used. and of course hydroxychloroquine which is not being used now but was thought to be good, is used for malaria and arthritis, so it is a good thing to look at existing drugs which we know are safe and we know all about them, and re—purpose in them for covid. and there are so many trials going on, which is exciting. so it won't be surprising if something will come through in the next few months. the deputy chief medical officer, professorjonathan deputy chief medical officer, professor jonathan van—tam, was talking about the country being at a
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tipping point as to whether or not the second wave of this virus is as deadly as the first one was, and perhaps some of those medicines that you have just mentioned perhaps some of those medicines that you havejust mentioned might perhaps some of those medicines that you have just mentioned might help us to not hit that same high peak, is that fair to say? i would like to say that, but the timing is the problem. on the 1st of september our death rate was 50, it is now over 500, so it has gone up tenfold in five or six weeks. so we are now looking at that second wave coming through, a bit faster, ithink, than was first thought, it was thought to be this kind of stage was predicted to be around the end of november. so i think that all those new drugs coming through, they will have to be manufactured. one thing about bcg we don't want to do is to take it away from all the children who are protected against tv, because otherwise we will get another problem, so we have got to have some time to prepare. so i don't think we will see any of these new drugs
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coming through until at least the winter period. by then i think we will unfortunately have reached our peak of coronavirus. and it does seem to be coming through just like it was in lockdown, when we were in a similar state when lockdown came in on march the 23rd. so are you therefore very concerned? i was hearing in the week in the north west of england for example hospital admissions now are at the same level ora admissions now are at the same level or a week or so ago they were at the same level as they were a few days after lockdown was brought in back in march, so the curve is certainly well on the way. yes, i am concerned. we have got dexamethasone, we do know more about the virus then we did before, it did come as a massive wave beforehand and overwhelmed the nhs in many ways. so hopefully the death rate won't be quite so bad. also, after the end of winter, you haven't got a lot more vulnerable population, hopefully we haven't quite got such
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a big population so vulnerable. so we may see a slight darling of the death rate, but it is coming through, and it is no doubt we have got to take, be incredibly cautious and get ourselves prepared for this wave. and we havejust and get ourselves prepared for this wave. and we have just got to get ourselves prepared. if you can lose weight, lose weight. if you can exercise, exercise. and make sure that you have got your houses cold, oran that you have got your houses cold, or an elderly relative has got the house warm as well, because if you are cold, your immune system is challenged, so keeping warm at home is incredibly important for the winter. and a quick thought from you if you can. i appreciate it is leading you into political territory, but there is a balance to be struck from the prime minister tomorrow talking about greater restrictions in different parts of the country whilst also trying to keep the economy open as much as possible. what would you like to see? i have worked in the nhs now for 30 years, and i have seen lots of times when governments have come
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in and the impact on health. the big danger is always to actually not listen to those in local areas and not listen to the health professionals who really know the business day by day. they know how people respond in their local area. and i think these levels which have been promised for tomorrow to be announced i think that is great, that will give some simplicity, but there has to be a lot of local scope to change it as well, to have a nuance of what would happen in liverpool, which won't be the same as manchester or bolton, and to give some more power for as manchester or bolton, and to give some more powerfor the local decision—making to be made by directors of public health is a really key thing that is going to transform the way these local lockdown's work. and i think they really will then be effective. and just a quick thought if i can on masks. something that we are all now becoming accustomed to, we all got getting used to wearing them in
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shops and on public transport. do you think we will need to see wider use of masks, may be people having to wear them in the workplace? for example we don't have to wear them in ouroffice, example we don't have to wear them in our office, but maybe that is a sensible next step. i know the bma said yesterday, we have got to put them on outdoors as well if you can't keep distancing to two metres, and everyone at work should have it. i don't know. it has to be done on the evidence. outdoors we know is a very, very safe place to be. if you don't want to get coronavirus, go outdoors. if you are crammed up with people, then of course it is not going to be so safe, and therefore you have got to keep that social distancing or wear a mask. so i agree with that. but in work, a lot of research has shown about how it is all about airflow, it is about how stuffy the place is, and how much co2 accumulates, so you can tell how good a place is going to be. if you have got good laminate airflow and air conditioning, you
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are going to be pretty safe, and the evidence shows that. if you are in a stuffy place with no air circulating at all, no ventilation, you will not be in at all, no ventilation, you will not beina at all, no ventilation, you will not be in a good place. so i wouldn't really like to see it across the whole of the workplace, i don't think that is necessary. but i do think that is necessary. but i do think areas where there is a bit more cramming and you are unable, particularly in factories where the temperature is cooler, so we know that 4 degrees is the ultimate temperature for the virus to work. if you have that coolness and no airflow changing, then it is going to be very safe to wear a mask. but if you are in an office like you are at the moment, probably good air conditioning, you really probably don't need to wear a mask at all. so i don't think we should have a blanket. i think it should be more specific. very grateful to you, thank you very much indeed for talking to us. dr william bird talking to us. dr william bird talking to us from reading this morning. the andrew marr show will be here on bbc one at 9am, let's find out what he's got
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in store this morning. good morning, andrew. good morning. i feel good morning, andrew. good morning. ifeel in my good morning, andrew. good morning. i feel in my very old bones that it is going to be a news morning. i have been talking to david green held, the conservative leader of bolton council, to professor peter hovey, the government epidemiologist and adviser about a possible new national lockdown. i will be talking to lisa nandy, shadow foreign secretary and wigan mp, and to the communities secretary robert jenrick. join me if you can at nine. look forward to it, andrew, many thanks. it is just approaching 8.30. you are watching at breakfast. more on the new coronavirus was touch and is coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. talks on further coronavirus restrictions for the worst—hit parts of england will take place today. the government and local leaders will discuss the measures, ahead of an expected announcement on the new rules tomorrow. but council leaders and mayors say the help offered to those no longer able to work because of the restrictions is inadequate.
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let's speak now to jamie driscoll, who is the labour mayor for the north of tyne combined authority. good authority. to see you. the papers are full of good to see you. the papers are full of speculation this morning about what tomorrow might bring. what do you know for certain? we have spoke with government officials. we asked very specifically will we be moving into tier three? we were pulled the prime minister would be laying out what tier three is, but we don't yet know whether we're moving into tier three or not. so you don't necessarily know what the parameters of territory are whether you will be in them or not. the government say they are engaging with local and civic leaders in a meaningful way. is the reality? there are meetings going on, but we met as the region.
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all of the council leaders, myself, we met on friday. we asked the ministers then. and there was a lot of clarifications that we were trying to get about, for example, what is the threshold that would trigger you moving into tier three? we were told it would be complex and would be a decision that would be taken. what we want is a decision where we are directly involved in that, where our directors of public health get to see the evidence, and we are not seeing the evidence for this. and on that basis, we would work together. you just had an expert on sing the close of people make the decisions are to the evidence, the better the decisions are. it is not entirely clear what tier three would entail. the closure of pubs completely is being considered. maybe not even being allowed to leave your borough. was that much made clear to you's they would be a mixture of restrictions
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enforced by law and guidance. the guidance being not allowed to move, but if it is going to be guidance on people voluntarily choosing to do that. in terms of being locked down, we we re that. in terms of being locked down, we were told that on tier three, it would be pubs and bars, but not restau ra nts. would be pubs and bars, but not restaurants. it may be the case that restau ra nts restaurants. it may be the case that restaurants are included on a case—by—case basis. it seems like very tricky territory. anybody watching will know that it is not easy to distinguish what is a buyer and what is a restaurant. do you get the sense that it is not that they are refusing to share the decisions, it is that they have not made their minds up yet about what these tiers would mean and also what would put you into tier three? i think you are spot on there. there is a lot of uncertainty going on. what we know is that any restrictions work better if people are very clear about them, and that is what we want. we want
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absolute clarity. i am supportive of having the three tier system. it is very ha rd having the three tier system. it is very hard for the public to keep up, very hard for the public to keep up, very ha rd very hard for the public to keep up, very hard for the public to keep up, very hard for business owners to plan. so the tier system is great but it has to be very clear so we can have national television adverts, national radio adverts so that people know what is expected of them. how would you sum up the levels of engagements where you are north of tyne? do you think that people are willing to do the right thing, they want to do the right thing, they want to do the right thing but they don't necessarily know what that looks like at the minute? i think the vast majority of people want to keep themselves safe, wa nt to people want to keep themselves safe, want to keep other people safe and credit to people who want to do that. i think there is an element of people unable to fully comply. at the moment, if you suspect that you have symptoms, you are supposed to self—isolate. there is no financial support for that. if you are someone
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who is getting by on minimum wage and you are supposed to take time off unpaid, or if you are unemployed, how are you going to do that without money? the better we can financially support people, the better people will enforce the regulations themselves and the sooner we will all be through this. the government have said there has been an extensive package of support available to everybody through the furlough scheme and now we are moving to the two thirds scheme of furlough for people whose jobs have been affected, but they say we are ata been affected, but they say we are at a tipping point. and with that comes financial implications with my the reality is that if you are a minimum wage worker and you have been told that you cannot go to work, you can't go to the supermarket and say i am on 67% of my wages, is it ok if i pay for 67%
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of my shopping and take the rest for free? the original furlough was 8096. we are now six months on and a lot of people's financial reserves have been burned through. people are really struggling, my inbox is full of stories. if we're going to keep the economy afloat, we need to be supporting people. it is not a cce pta ble supporting people. it is not acceptable for people on minimum wage to be told, i am sorry, you are not even going to get that. when we talk to people in the north—west, they understand the need to do it. what they don't necessarily understand is whether it is beneficial at the moment. are you being given data that suggests that the sacrifices that people are making are making a difference? we went into a next set of lockdown regulations on the 18th of september and another set on the 30th. what we saw is that they were climbing and now they are level. the cases are falling. most of the recent spikes
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are very much around universities. you put 20,000 young people in the same set of buildings, lo and behold, we had a spike. who saw that coming? the regulations that we have got are actually having an effect, and that is what the evidence is supporting. if the evidence is there saying that extra lockdown will work, we will support that, and certainly in the north—east, all of the council leaders, we meet regularly and we are seeing the same pattern. regulations that we put in our having an effect. we don't need extra ones. what we need is the spikes in the student population dealing with and the support so that people can self—isolate? dealing with and the support so that people can self-isolate? do you want to be the mayor that refuses measures and sees your hospital's overwhelmed? because that is a possibility. that is what it comes down to. if our public health
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experts, our directors of public health can directly see the evidence of where it is going, on a case—by—case basis, then we would absolutely support that. one of the things that would make a difference is if we had the rapid powers to close things. at the moment, the council can really only close things that have a license like a pub. this isa that have a license like a pub. this is a spread across all different sorts of legislation. things like, for example, shops, supermarkets who are not enforcing these regulations well. if you had the power to close them, all of them would start enforcing it better and you wouldn't even have to close them. all of those things make a difference. there is no point in having regulations that people are not going to follow. best of luck in the hours and days ahead. i'm sure it is been to be completed for you and many leaders like you. let us catch up many leaders like you. let us catch up on all the daily‘s sport. holly is here for us. let's start with
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tennis. this isjust last year at the french open. if it was a movie saga, this would be episode 56! novak djokovic and rafa nadalface off in another grand slam final. for world number one novak djokovic, a chance to close in on nadal‘s all—time record of 19 grand slams. but if nadal claims his 20th today, well, that would equal roger federer‘s record. he is the defending champion, but knows all too well what djokovic is capable of. to play against novak, i need to play my best. you know, without playing my best, then this situation is very difficult. i know that is a court that i have been playing well for such a long time, so that helps. but at the same time, he has an amazing record here too, being in the final rounds almost
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every single time. so, he's one of the toughest opponents possible. while nadal bids for his 20th grand slam title, this woman is enjoying her very first. what a moment for polish teenager iga swiatek who beat australian open champion sophia kenin to claim the women's final yesterday. 19 years old, she's the lowest—ranked woman to win at roland garros. and apparentlyjust a week ago, she had been unsure whether she would commit to tennis long—term or go to university. i think she made the right decision. and britain's alfie hewett completed a perfect french open, claiming his fourth grand slam wheelchair singles title. he also won the doubles title on friday with gordon reid. exeter look to be picking up where saracens left off — becoming the dominant club in english rugby. they're still on for a domestic and european double. they're favourites for
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the premiership final in a fortnight, after brushing aside bath in their playoff semi—final. it's the fifth straight season the chiefs have made the twickenham showpiece. it'll be a repeat of the 2017 final after wasps beat bristol in the other semi. head coach lee blackett says they'll have to keep their emotions in check in a fortnight as they chase a first title in 12 years. as the english season draws to a close, the pro14 is already underway where cardiff made it two wins from two with victory over connacht. elsewhere ulster beat ospreys, whilst edinburgh lost to munster. lewis hamilton has another chance to equal michael schumacher‘s record 91 formula one victories later today. he starts from second on the grid at the eifel grand prix. his mercedes team mate valtteri bottas was quarter of a second quicker around germany's nurburgring, ending hamilton's run
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of five poles in a row. however, all is not lost for hamilton as four of the last five winners at this circuit have started from second on the grid. britain's alex dowsett won stage 8 of the giro d'italia. the time—trial specialist broke away with 11 miles to go, and held on to win the stage by over a minute. he rides for the israel start—up nation team, who chris froome isjoining next year. portugal'sjoao almeida still leads overall. he's the man in front going into the final round of the pga championship at wentworth, although most people seem to be more concerned about his hoodie than his golf on social media. it prompted a bit of a debate on acceptable dress codes. he's not worried, though — he made an eagle and three birdies on his way to 14 under par for a three shot lead going into the final round later.
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he's went on to twitter to defend his hoodie, saying it should be embraced rather then sneered at. iam i am starting to think there is something in this hoodie phenomenon on. here's another englishman rather pleased with his effort — it's jordan smith. he got a hole in one from 139 yards on the par—three second hole. wait for it... yes! what a feeling that must be. it has been really interesting, the debate around this hoodie thing. their second outfits that have to be one, and a lot of people have issues of people are wearing the wrong socks, for example, ona wearing the wrong socks, for example, on a golf course. this hoodie has caused a bit of a stir. people like to get pent up about lots of silly things like don't
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they? i said wearing a hoodie this morning was pushing it, roger. it is an interesting one, isn't it, because they're a talk of some tv programmes, you need to wear a tie. i think you probably would for something like this, but for something like this, but for something else... it does extend beyond sport. but the thing about golf, they are 20 attract a younger audience, they are 20 bring in new fa ns audience, they are 20 bring in new fans from a younger generation. perhaps this is something we need to embrace. this was talked about, saying it shouldn't be sneered at but should be embraced instead. he is leading the way, as well, so there might be something in it. talking about being a little boy, aged five, standing at wentworth and watching and being a part of it. it is fairy tale stuff. i think there
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will be more attention than usual to what exactly he is going to be wearing. and she was actually giving away hoodies on social media. once he! it certainly caused a bit of a stir! what time do we need to tune in? it will be much later in the day. highlights on bbc two later on this evening. i am going to read the news on andrew meyer after nine o'clock. i am going to leave you. —— marr. running a marathon is a gruelling challenge at the best of times, but imagine completing one 3000 feet underground — in a mining tunnel. that's exactly what one group of fundraisers in yorkshire spent their day doing yesterday, and they've broken a world record in the process. joining us now are sally
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orange and rob smaling, who took part in this underground marathon challenge. just explain where exactly you were and why you did it. sadly, we will come to you first. —— sally. and why you did it. sadly, we will come to you first. -- sally. we were 1000 below ground. and it wasn't your first marathon, was 1000 below ground. and it wasn't yourfirst marathon, was it? but i would imagine it was a very different experience to previous marathons. women than usual, for a start. it was between 35 and 40 degrees. it was really, really hot. it was also really hilly, which was surprising down there. lots of different challenges. we did it as a team. there were seven challenges altogether. we started together, we
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finished together. it was a fantastic experience. how many of you in the team? seven. i am here and now, very proud with these certificates because we actually break to guinness world records. what was the second? with it being world mental health day yesterday, we called it a marathon beneath the surface because like mental health, you don't know what is going on beneath the surface. but also with the army cadets, we retained by the record for the online... mental health training course, so we got that record as well, so double records. crucially, i always think events like this, underground, 40 degrees heat, did you all get along? we did. that is what was very good about it, the fact that we all
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pulled each other through and we got together as a team. sally, to be fair, was unbelievable yesterday and ke pt fair, was unbelievable yesterday and kept the smile on everybody's face. we saw a sally's certificates there and explained what records had been broken. what are you holding? i was honoured last night to receive one of the remembrance pennies from the cadet force and also a poppy that was given to all of the runners that took part yesterday. like i said, it was an absolutely amazing achievement, what we did. and to get recognition from the cadet force and to be awarded these was just a massive honour. why was it so important to you to highlight illnesses that can't always necessarily be seen with my i think generally all of us struggle at some point in time. and i think for it
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me, it was a case ofjust trying to show that there are people out there willing to help, indirectly or face to face. there is always somebody there who is out there who you can reach out to and who is willing to help you. that is part and parcel of why all of us took part, just to show that there are people out there who are willing to give a hand and reach out and help people. sally, coming from an army background, presumably you have seen how perceptions of mental health and mental health awareness have evolved for the better over recent years?” think there is still a long way to go. i think there is a lot of mental health awareness, but that is what the army was damaged cadets wanted to do. online training, having people understand —— what the army
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cadets wanted to do. the awareness is one thing, but i find sometimes that people still don't know what to say. sometimes they don't need to say. sometimes they don't need to say anything, they just say. sometimes they don't need to say anything, theyjust need to be there. from personal experience, thatis there. from personal experience, that is knowing that there is somebody there. a lot of people are afraid if somebody talks about chilly side, they think they are going to do it. butjust being there with somebody, i know that people don't like to talk about suicide, but unfortunately, one in four people struggle with mental health challenges. it is something we women need to talk about and know how to help each other. coming from a mining background, it is important that in all communities, these sorts of conversations are normalised? that is exactly right. as you said, it is one of those things that people tend not to talk about, but i
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feel like we need to. and i know that we're definitely trying to raise awareness of it within the company, which is a massive step, as can imagine, working in a different environment. but it is good that we can get out there and, hopefully, it might encourage even that one person to step forward and discuss the problems we have got. and just even to reach out to one person, that can make a massive difference. absolutely. congratulations to you both and the rest of the team. i will let you put your arms down. thank you forjoining us this morning. let's check in with louise now for a final look at the weather this morning. yesterday, there were quite a few showers in scotland. today, it is going to be much quieter and notjust today, it is going to be much quieter and not just in today, it is going to be much quieter and notjust in scotland, but for many of us. we are under the influence of high pressure. this weather front will spoil the story
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tomorrow. the further east that you are, you will run at the risk of sharper showers than that north sea coastline. a future is likely across west wales and south—west england. generally speaking, lighter winds, more sunshine and fewer showers for most of us is the story today. it means that temperatures will recover just a touch. we could get 15 or 16 degrees if you get that sometime. the rain does arrive and that will arrive through this evening and overnight. it is going to bring some wet weather into western fringes of scotla nd wet weather into western fringes of scotland and northern ireland as well. we might see clearer skies continuing into the far south—east. perhaps single figures in rural parts first thing. early morning sunshine into the south—east but it will be the early bird that sees that. clouding over gradually as we go through the day. that train moves out of scotland and northern
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ireland. an improving picture in the afternoon, and you tend to see it through the spine of the country. those temperatures are going to struggle around nine or 10 degrees, so that is very disappointing for the middle of october. that weather front will take its time to clear away. an improving story for scotla nd away. an improving story for scotland and northern england on tuesday. the tail end of that weather front sinks its way south and east. some showery outbreaks of rain moving across england and stand to the south—east corner. still, those temperatures disappointing and we are looking at a maximum of ten to 13 degrees. drier, brighterwith more sunshine to come from wednesday onwards. make the most of it, it does look like it is going to be pleasa nt does look like it is going to be pleasant and settled with high of 14 degrees.
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while this year's britain's got talent may have felt a little different to usual, the pyrotechnics and glitter were still present last night, as the show crowned it's winner. musical comedian jon courtenay, bagged himself the coveted slot on the royal variety performance. he was his winning performance. # and it won't be long before these masks have gone # we'll be living life again to the maximum # and we'll remember people like sircaptain tom # and in years, our kids will be reminiscing # not about the big stuff that they've been missing # but that everyday they got to play with dad and mum # and we'll remember that we were strong when mcdonald's # was closed for so very long # and britain's talent will be that we all carry on.# we can now talk to tv critic scott bryan who watched
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all of the action last night. did you enjoy it? was he a worthy winner? it was a very long show, i am not going to beat around the bush. it was a winner that i really think reflected the year that we have all been in. jon was highlighting the emotional moments and also how we will look back at this period and be proud of how we all stood together. i think that for itv and britain's got talent which had to adjust their show very much to compensate to even allow in this show to continue, it sort of reflects the weird year we have all been in. there was something about the speed that they moved in through the speed that they moved in through the rounds that was quite engaging, built up momentum quite quickly? they pre—recorded quite a lot of the
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different segments to make the whole show flow. there was quite a black mirror desk wall of people from their own homes. i would find it weird if you were a performer performing on that night, with all of the previous years... the comedian was reflecting on all of the complaints that britain's got talent had received after diversity‘s performance and she made his entire sets directly aimed at those people who complain. i am absolutely fascinated to see how many ofcom complaints they are going to be during the next few weeks. he was funny, though. he was really funny, really spot on. it was that uncompromising take on the event for a show that would be watched by millions, i think it was a thing that britain's got talent wouldn't have had five years ago. strictly
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was the best of the best last night. let's take a look now at a clip from last night's strictly special, which featured a moving tribute to the tv presenter caroline flack, who won strictly in 2014. i think, for me, caroline was probably one of the best, best dancers we've ever had come into strictly come dancing. i think even from week one, she did a cha—cha with pasha and she just blew everyone away. to perform three dances in the final to that level is phenomenal. applause. ijust remember watching caroline's show dance and just thinking, "she's won. and she so deserves to win." and i can now reveal the strictly come dancing champions 2014 are... caroline! we won strictly come dancing. incredible. doesn't quite seem real, does it? so
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much excitement ahead of this year's strictly. can it possibly be the same? i think they have had contingency plans for absolutely every single thing that could happen between now and christmas, but this isa between now and christmas, but this is a show that is happening at a time where, as you have been reporting this morning, there are new rules and much debate happening around different regions around the country. the issue is that if a dancer or a performer gets coronavirus, despite their being in a bubble, despite all of the different plans taking place, what then happens to the overall show? but at the same time, i think entertainment formats as we have seen with britain's got talent can be important distractions entertainment wise for everybody. i know it the bbc are trying to do everything that they can, but there will be social distancing, i think they are going to be pretty much
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making changes directly up until the first day. there is so much appetite for some good upbeat television at the moment. believe it or not, i am still doing my own hair and make—up at the moment! that's all from breakfast this morning. we'll be back tomorrow from 6am. until then, have a lovely sunday.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. our top stories. a final night out for some ahead of an announcement on new coronavirus restrictions in england. there are last minute meetings in government to iron out the details as local leaders warn more financial assistance is needed. when the state says you may not go to work, you may not trade, then people should be getting 100% compensation. a warning from england's deputy chief medical officer that the country is at a tipping point in the fight against covid—19 the white house doctor says president trump is no longer a transmission risk to others, but has not said whether he's tested negative for covid—19. rescuers search for survivors after a missile attack

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